Session Title

Translating Back: Vernacular Sources and Prestige-Language Adaptations

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Marian Homans-Turnbull

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley

Presider Name

Alexandra Reider

Presider Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 1

Old English to Latin Translation in an Early Anglo-Norman Version of the "Enlarged Herbarium"

Presenter 1 Name

Bethany Christiansen

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Is a Language What We Think It Is? The Case of (Outremer) French in London, BL, Add. 15268

Presenter 2 Name

Johannes Junge Ruhland

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 3

Bracciolini's Liber facetiarum: Mediating Neo-Latin via the Translatio of the Novella

Presenter 3 Name

Brenda B. Rosado

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley

Paper Title 4

Latin and Old English in the Twelfth Century

Presenter 4 Name

Anna Lyman

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Start Date

12-5-2019 8:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1255

Description

Multilingual cultures develop complex practices and theories of translation. Building on a series of important and explanatory frameworks proposed for understanding translation from a lingua franca such as Latin into a local or lower-prestige language—the path medieval translation appears most often to have taken—this panel examines translation in the other direction. Drawing examples from England, Italy, and the French diaspora, the papers on this panel address both individual instances of translation from what has traditionally been understood as a lower-prestige language into a higher-prestige one, and the bearing of such “back”-translations on existing frameworks for understanding medieval translation writ large.

- Marian Homans-Turnbull and Alexandra Reider

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May 12th, 8:30 AM

Translating Back: Vernacular Sources and Prestige-Language Adaptations

Schneider 1255

Multilingual cultures develop complex practices and theories of translation. Building on a series of important and explanatory frameworks proposed for understanding translation from a lingua franca such as Latin into a local or lower-prestige language—the path medieval translation appears most often to have taken—this panel examines translation in the other direction. Drawing examples from England, Italy, and the French diaspora, the papers on this panel address both individual instances of translation from what has traditionally been understood as a lower-prestige language into a higher-prestige one, and the bearing of such “back”-translations on existing frameworks for understanding medieval translation writ large.

- Marian Homans-Turnbull and Alexandra Reider