Session Title

Making the Most of the Medieval: Collective Strategies for K-16 Cooperation (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

K-12 Committee, Medieval Academy of America

Organizer Name

Reid S. Weber

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Central Oklahoma

Presider Name

Reid S. Weber

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Rachelle E. Friedman

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Lycée Français de New York

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Kisha G. Tracy

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Fitchburg State Univ.

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Maren Clegg Hyer

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Valdosta State Univ.

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Michael Burger

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Auburn Univ.-Montgomery

Start Date

10-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1360

Description

Recently, concerning changes to AP World History were announced, stating that it would no longer cover content pre-1450. This announcement has been met with apprehension throughout the premodern studies community. Where will students learn the context of later culture if they are not exposed to early history? In this roundtable, we will discuss and emphasize how the medieval can be taught across the curriculum and the value in doing so. We will address the following:

1) How the Middle Ages can be taught beyond the traditional literature and history curriculum (ex. in science, math, etc.)

2) How the Middle Ages can be used to teach standards and requirements even as the medieval is beginning to be erased explicitly from curriculum (ex. using medieval context to teach required math concepts, etc.)

3) How higher education and secondary education can utilize opportunities for building mutually beneficial relationships and cooperation to increase subject visibility, improve classroom content, and inspire future medieval studies majors.

K-12 educators often want to include premodern content into their courses, but they need guidance and resources in order to do so, especially in the face of a continuing lack of support for premodern studies. This panel seeks both to broaden discussion on how to incorporate the premodern into K-12 curriculum and how to support our collective K-16 argument that it is significant. Reid S. Weber

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Making the Most of the Medieval: Collective Strategies for K-16 Cooperation (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1360

Recently, concerning changes to AP World History were announced, stating that it would no longer cover content pre-1450. This announcement has been met with apprehension throughout the premodern studies community. Where will students learn the context of later culture if they are not exposed to early history? In this roundtable, we will discuss and emphasize how the medieval can be taught across the curriculum and the value in doing so. We will address the following:

1) How the Middle Ages can be taught beyond the traditional literature and history curriculum (ex. in science, math, etc.)

2) How the Middle Ages can be used to teach standards and requirements even as the medieval is beginning to be erased explicitly from curriculum (ex. using medieval context to teach required math concepts, etc.)

3) How higher education and secondary education can utilize opportunities for building mutually beneficial relationships and cooperation to increase subject visibility, improve classroom content, and inspire future medieval studies majors.

K-12 educators often want to include premodern content into their courses, but they need guidance and resources in order to do so, especially in the face of a continuing lack of support for premodern studies. This panel seeks both to broaden discussion on how to incorporate the premodern into K-12 curriculum and how to support our collective K-16 argument that it is significant. Reid S. Weber