Session Title

Moving Images: The Badge in Medieval Christendom

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Lloyd de Beer

Organizer Affiliation

British Museum

Presider Name

Amy Jeffs

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Cambridge

Paper Title 1

The Holy Land in Paris: Embroidering, Depicting, and Molding the Passion in a Fifteenth-Century Book of Hours (Paris, Bibliothèque de l'Arsenal, MS 1176)

Presenter 1 Name

Loretta Vandi

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Scuola del Libro, Urbino

Paper Title 2

Political Instability and the Badge as Unstable Object

Presenter 2 Name

Sonja Drimmer

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst

Paper Title 3

Share a Same Sign: The Uses of Emblematic Badges at the End of Middle Ages: The Case of the Armagnac-Burgundy War

Presenter 3 Name

Laurent Hablot

Presenter 3 Affiliation

École Pratique des Hautes Études

Start Date

9-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1325

Description

Medieval badges helped define communities: they marked and traversed territorial boundaries; they were worn by religious devotees, military retainers and groups that shared the same jokes and stories. What do badges reveal about medieval visual culture? What is the impact of scale, variety and proliferation on our understanding of these emblems’ multifarious purposes?

The term “medieval badge” is ambiguous. Is it a pewter token worn on clothing, such as a livery badge or a pilgrim souvenir? Does it not also describe the prestigious Dunstable Swan Jewel at the British Museum or the image of the white hart worn by the figures of the Wilton Diptych? Likewise, it can mean an emblematic image, in any medium. These often appear in manuscripts, paintings, architecture, sculpture, and a host of more fragile objects, such as embroidered banners. Larger works of art could become miniature signs, such as the depiction of St Thomas Becket’s head reliquary reproduced on Canterbury pilgrim souvenirs. Inversely, emblematic metal badges appear as trompe-l’oeil in virtuosic paintings. Their geographical and material flexibility calls out for scholarly exploration.

This session will consider the medieval badge in its widest theoretical contexts, using ideas of motion and mobility as a starting point. Lloyd de Beer

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Moving Images: The Badge in Medieval Christendom

Schneider 1325

Medieval badges helped define communities: they marked and traversed territorial boundaries; they were worn by religious devotees, military retainers and groups that shared the same jokes and stories. What do badges reveal about medieval visual culture? What is the impact of scale, variety and proliferation on our understanding of these emblems’ multifarious purposes?

The term “medieval badge” is ambiguous. Is it a pewter token worn on clothing, such as a livery badge or a pilgrim souvenir? Does it not also describe the prestigious Dunstable Swan Jewel at the British Museum or the image of the white hart worn by the figures of the Wilton Diptych? Likewise, it can mean an emblematic image, in any medium. These often appear in manuscripts, paintings, architecture, sculpture, and a host of more fragile objects, such as embroidered banners. Larger works of art could become miniature signs, such as the depiction of St Thomas Becket’s head reliquary reproduced on Canterbury pilgrim souvenirs. Inversely, emblematic metal badges appear as trompe-l’oeil in virtuosic paintings. Their geographical and material flexibility calls out for scholarly exploration.

This session will consider the medieval badge in its widest theoretical contexts, using ideas of motion and mobility as a starting point. Lloyd de Beer