Session Title

Unbound Iberia: The Uses of Manuscript and Print Material from Medieval and Early Modern Spain

Sponsoring Organization(s)

La corónica: A Journal of Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Organizer Name

Jonathan Burgoyne

Organizer Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Presider Name

Heather Bamford

Presider Affiliation

George Washington Univ.

Paper Title 1

On the Complutensian Polyglot Bible's Cultural Ambiguities

Presenter 1 Name

Erik Alder

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Brigham Young Univ.

Paper Title 2

From Bestselling Book to Confiscated Codex: Dichos de los siete sabios de Grecia in "Unbound Iberia"

Presenter 2 Name

Andrea Pauw

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Virginia

Paper Title 3

Reading Medieval Polemics in Seventeenth-Century Tunis: Lilly Sp. Hist. Ms. 1628

Presenter 3 Name

Ryan Giles

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Start Date

11-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1355

Description

Modern histories of the book and literature inform our understanding of writing and reading as modes of creating and transmitting knowledge, but the myriad and often heterodox uses of manuscripts and print materials can disrupt our vertical thinking about reading, as well as our historical understanding of books and their audiences. This panel examines manuscript and printed objects from Iberia in ways that challenge our understanding of book history, authorship, readers, and the meaning of medieval and early modern literature by following the ways in which the written word, texts and books were broken off from their intellectual and hermeneutic underpinnings. Jonathan D. Burgoyne

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Unbound Iberia: The Uses of Manuscript and Print Material from Medieval and Early Modern Spain

Schneider 1355

Modern histories of the book and literature inform our understanding of writing and reading as modes of creating and transmitting knowledge, but the myriad and often heterodox uses of manuscripts and print materials can disrupt our vertical thinking about reading, as well as our historical understanding of books and their audiences. This panel examines manuscript and printed objects from Iberia in ways that challenge our understanding of book history, authorship, readers, and the meaning of medieval and early modern literature by following the ways in which the written word, texts and books were broken off from their intellectual and hermeneutic underpinnings. Jonathan D. Burgoyne