Session Title

Reading (in) the Middle Ages II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Stanford Univ.

Organizer Name

Rowan Dorin

Organizer Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Presider Name

Mae Lyons-Penner

Presider Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 1

How to Read Exempla: Problems in Ontology and Method

Presenter 1 Name

Julie Orlemanski

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 2

Is a Machine Capable of Reading Medieval Manuscripts?

Presenter 2 Name

Sébastien Brisbois

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. de Strasbourg

Paper Title 3

Problems and Perspectives of OCR Training for Middle English

Presenter 3 Name

Gianmarco E. Saretto

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Paper Title 4

Annotating the Middle Ages

Presenter 4 Name

Andrew Prescott

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Glasgow

Start Date

10-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1280

Description

This panel is inspired by the tenth anniversary of Representations’ special issue, “The Way We Read Now”. It asks where we are ten years later, inviting scholars to reflect on their own modes of scholarly reading of medieval texts. In their 2009 introduction to “The Way We Read Now”, Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best noted a declining enthusiasm among scholars in “text-based disciplines” for reading texts symptomatically in order to expose their ideological priorities. Instead, they argued that literal readings should no longer be dismissed out of hand and called for renewed attention to the materiality of a text, the cognitive processes of reading, and the formal characteristics of a text. For medievalists, this paradox of dissimulation and display may be particularly acute, intensified by temporal, cultural and linguistic estrangement. In the last decade, surface reading, distant reading, new formalism, new sociology and other kinds of phenomenological engagement have been touted as new ways of attending to the particularities of literary objects. How has this step-back from ideological demystification affected the kinds of claims we make, and the research we pursue? How have new technologies changed the possibilities for reading medieval sources? How has the fusion of book history into literary criticism affected the status of both disciplines? ~Rowan Dorin & Mae Lyons-Penner

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

Reading (in) the Middle Ages II

Schneider 1280

This panel is inspired by the tenth anniversary of Representations’ special issue, “The Way We Read Now”. It asks where we are ten years later, inviting scholars to reflect on their own modes of scholarly reading of medieval texts. In their 2009 introduction to “The Way We Read Now”, Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best noted a declining enthusiasm among scholars in “text-based disciplines” for reading texts symptomatically in order to expose their ideological priorities. Instead, they argued that literal readings should no longer be dismissed out of hand and called for renewed attention to the materiality of a text, the cognitive processes of reading, and the formal characteristics of a text. For medievalists, this paradox of dissimulation and display may be particularly acute, intensified by temporal, cultural and linguistic estrangement. In the last decade, surface reading, distant reading, new formalism, new sociology and other kinds of phenomenological engagement have been touted as new ways of attending to the particularities of literary objects. How has this step-back from ideological demystification affected the kinds of claims we make, and the research we pursue? How have new technologies changed the possibilities for reading medieval sources? How has the fusion of book history into literary criticism affected the status of both disciplines? ~Rowan Dorin & Mae Lyons-Penner