Session Title

Teaching Manuscripts in a New Light (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Stanford Univ.

Organizer Name

Benjamin Albritton

Organizer Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Presider Name

Rowan Dorin

Presider Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 1

A Traveling Virtual Reality Workstation for Studying Manuscripts

Presenter 1 Name

William F. Endres

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Oklahoma

Paper Title 2

Conservation and Scientific Imaging

Presenter 2 Name

Kristen St. John

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Lazarus Project

Presenter 3 Name

Alexander J. Zawacki

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Rochester

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Elizabeth McAulay

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Los Angeles

Start Date

10-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1040

Description

The growing availability of scientific imaging techniques for the study of medieval manuscripts is opening new avenues for investigating the physical objects through digital means. Whether using multi-spectral, x-ray tomography, reflectance transformation, or 3D imaging techniques, we now have access to analytical tools that focus on information beyond what is available to the naked eye, and which invite approaches that combine quantitative and qualitative evaluations of manuscript materials. Whether focusing on the recovery of lost or hidden texts, analyzing ink composition, exploring layers of decoration, or modeling the physicality of medieval objects, these technologies can be used to enhance our engagement with the physical histories of our materials of study. This roundtable invites participants who are actively engaged in the use of such imaging techniques to discuss questions about student involvement, pedagogical approaches, classroom successes, and new modalities of communicating with a broader audience about the complexities of manuscript production and use. Benjamin Albritton

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Teaching Manuscripts in a New Light (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1040

The growing availability of scientific imaging techniques for the study of medieval manuscripts is opening new avenues for investigating the physical objects through digital means. Whether using multi-spectral, x-ray tomography, reflectance transformation, or 3D imaging techniques, we now have access to analytical tools that focus on information beyond what is available to the naked eye, and which invite approaches that combine quantitative and qualitative evaluations of manuscript materials. Whether focusing on the recovery of lost or hidden texts, analyzing ink composition, exploring layers of decoration, or modeling the physicality of medieval objects, these technologies can be used to enhance our engagement with the physical histories of our materials of study. This roundtable invites participants who are actively engaged in the use of such imaging techniques to discuss questions about student involvement, pedagogical approaches, classroom successes, and new modalities of communicating with a broader audience about the complexities of manuscript production and use. Benjamin Albritton