Session Title

More than Marvel: Representations of Norse Mythology in Contemporary Popular Culture III: Channeling the Myths

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture

Organizer Name

Michael A. Torregrossa

Organizer Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Presider Name

Jolanta N. Komornicka

Presider Affiliation

St. Jerome's Univ., Univ. of Waterloo

Paper Title 1

Medieval Motifs in DreamWorks Dragons

Presenter 1 Name

Sandra Hartl

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Otto-Friedrich-Univ. Bamberg

Paper Title 2

Reinterpretation of Norse mythology in Trollhunters: Tales of Arcadia

Presenter 2 Name

Geneviève Pigeon

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. du Québec-Montréal

Paper Title 3

"Her temper was still the same": Women Resisting Colonialism in Modern Viking Narratives

Presenter 3 Name

Margaret Sheble (Winner of the Thomas Ohlgren Award for Best Graduate Student Essay in Medieval and Renaissance Studies)

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Paper Title 4

God of War (2018) and Mythological Marvels

Presenter 4 Name

Andrew Barton

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Texas State Univ.-San Marcos

Start Date

11-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1280

Description

Myths and legends from the Middle Ages remain important links to the past, and there has been much interest in recasting this material into post-medieval contexts, forging a bridge between our forebears and our modern selves. Creators of our own time have been especially prolific in reviving these stories for new audiences. The tales told of the gods of the Norsemen are one such medieval legacy to find currency today, and they have appeared in a variety of media, including comics. For example, Marvel Comics’ representation of the Norse god Thor has been an important element of its shared world since his debut in 1962, and, in its incorporation of the character into the Marvel Universe, the publisher has done much in the service of Medieval Studies through its widespread dissemination across the globe of a relatable depiction of the Norse Gods and the intricate mythology associated with them. Marvel’s account of Thor and his compatriots has also featured in an array of media beyond the pages of its long-running comic book series, and the recent release of three feature films centered around the Asgardian as part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, one of the world’s most popular and prosperous movie and television franchises, has provided additional texts to further knowledge of the Nine Worlds and its inhabitants. Nonetheless, while Marvel remains the most prominent creator of modern tales of the Norse gods, the company does not hold the exclusive rights to this material. Other writers, comics creators, filmmakers, television producers, and game designers have also appropriated the stories and legends of the gods of Asgard and further individuals within the cosmology of the Nine Worlds for their own purposes, yet their work remain relatively unknown when compared to the phenomenal success and reach of Marvel Comics and Marvel Studios.

It is the intent of this session to shed the spotlight on these other examples of Nordic-inspired medievalisms and to bring them into ongoing conversations and debates about the reception of the medieval in the post-medieval world.

Michael A. Torregrossa

Founder, Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

More than Marvel: Representations of Norse Mythology in Contemporary Popular Culture III: Channeling the Myths

Schneider 1280

Myths and legends from the Middle Ages remain important links to the past, and there has been much interest in recasting this material into post-medieval contexts, forging a bridge between our forebears and our modern selves. Creators of our own time have been especially prolific in reviving these stories for new audiences. The tales told of the gods of the Norsemen are one such medieval legacy to find currency today, and they have appeared in a variety of media, including comics. For example, Marvel Comics’ representation of the Norse god Thor has been an important element of its shared world since his debut in 1962, and, in its incorporation of the character into the Marvel Universe, the publisher has done much in the service of Medieval Studies through its widespread dissemination across the globe of a relatable depiction of the Norse Gods and the intricate mythology associated with them. Marvel’s account of Thor and his compatriots has also featured in an array of media beyond the pages of its long-running comic book series, and the recent release of three feature films centered around the Asgardian as part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, one of the world’s most popular and prosperous movie and television franchises, has provided additional texts to further knowledge of the Nine Worlds and its inhabitants. Nonetheless, while Marvel remains the most prominent creator of modern tales of the Norse gods, the company does not hold the exclusive rights to this material. Other writers, comics creators, filmmakers, television producers, and game designers have also appropriated the stories and legends of the gods of Asgard and further individuals within the cosmology of the Nine Worlds for their own purposes, yet their work remain relatively unknown when compared to the phenomenal success and reach of Marvel Comics and Marvel Studios.

It is the intent of this session to shed the spotlight on these other examples of Nordic-inspired medievalisms and to bring them into ongoing conversations and debates about the reception of the medieval in the post-medieval world.

Michael A. Torregrossa

Founder, Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture