Session Title

Queer Mentoring (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for the Study of Homosexuality in the Middle Ages (SSHMA)

Organizer Name

Graham N. Drake

Organizer Affiliation

SUNY-Geneseo

Presider Name

Graham N. Drake

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Kersti Francis

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Los Angeles

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Natalie Grinnell

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Wofford College

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Gregory S. Hutcheson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Louisville

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Felipe E. Rojas

Presenter 4 Affiliation

West Liberty Univ.

Paper Title 5

Discussant

Presenter 5 Name

Christopher M. Roman

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Kent State Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley 3 Stinson Lounge

Description

As scholars working with histories of homosexuality and investigations into the medieval queer, we are faced many times with texts and sources that seem hostile to our queer/gay/bisexual/transgender lives and identities. At the same time, for many of us, we face microagressions and bigotry at work and in the classroom. For this roundtable, “Queer Mentoring,” we would like to investigate how scholars navigate both what can be hostile from the past—the histories and descriptions of homosexual, bisexual, and transgender subjects—and what can be hostile now—the resistance from students, the interactions with colleagues, and the pushback from one’s larger communities, outside the university. How do LGBTQ+ scholars navigate university systems (either as faculty or graduate students) without obvious support or structures? And what steps can queer faculty or students take to find support. Graham N. Drake

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Queer Mentoring (A Roundtable)

Valley 3 Stinson Lounge

As scholars working with histories of homosexuality and investigations into the medieval queer, we are faced many times with texts and sources that seem hostile to our queer/gay/bisexual/transgender lives and identities. At the same time, for many of us, we face microagressions and bigotry at work and in the classroom. For this roundtable, “Queer Mentoring,” we would like to investigate how scholars navigate both what can be hostile from the past—the histories and descriptions of homosexual, bisexual, and transgender subjects—and what can be hostile now—the resistance from students, the interactions with colleagues, and the pushback from one’s larger communities, outside the university. How do LGBTQ+ scholars navigate university systems (either as faculty or graduate students) without obvious support or structures? And what steps can queer faculty or students take to find support. Graham N. Drake