Session Title

Gender and Engendering in the Works of the Pearl-Poet

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Pearl-Poet Society

Organizer Name

B. S. W. Barootes

Organizer Affiliation

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies

Presider Name

Kimberly Jack

Presider Affiliation

Athens State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Nurturing Fathers and Supportive Authorities: Reconsidering Paternal Affection in the Pearl-Poet's Works

Presenter 1 Name

Ashley E. Bartelt

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Northern Illinois Univ.

Paper Title 2

Untying and Re-Tying the "Endles Knot": Retroactively Reading Sir Gawain and the Green Knight as a Woman's Narrative

Presenter 2 Name

Jonathan Juilfs

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Redeemer Univ. College

Paper Title 3

"He Said, She Said," He Said: Gendered Dialogue in Pearl and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Presenter 3 Name

Florence Newman

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Towson Univ.

Paper Title 4

The Emotional Intelligence of Pearl: Purging the Jeweler of Gendered Irrationality

Presenter 4 Name

William M. Storm

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Eastern Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1235

Description

Morgan le Fay, Hagar and Sarah, Lady Bertilak, the Pearl-maiden, Lot’s unnamed wife and daughters, Queen Guinevere. Shrinking Gawain, wayward Jonah, ‘beardless’ Arthur, the gentle Jeweller, the Green Knight with his half-giant chest and shoulders to match. Households hoping for heirs; kingdoms that shall never know one. The Pearl-poet presents a broad spectrum of gendered characters. This session invites participants to consider how the poet plays with tropes of gender in the Cotton Nero A.x poems and St. Erkenwald. Benjamin Barootes

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Gender and Engendering in the Works of the Pearl-Poet

Schneider 1235

Morgan le Fay, Hagar and Sarah, Lady Bertilak, the Pearl-maiden, Lot’s unnamed wife and daughters, Queen Guinevere. Shrinking Gawain, wayward Jonah, ‘beardless’ Arthur, the gentle Jeweller, the Green Knight with his half-giant chest and shoulders to match. Households hoping for heirs; kingdoms that shall never know one. The Pearl-poet presents a broad spectrum of gendered characters. This session invites participants to consider how the poet plays with tropes of gender in the Cotton Nero A.x poems and St. Erkenwald. Benjamin Barootes