Session Title

Is There a Class in This Text? Teaching the Pearl-Poet (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Pearl-Poet Society

Organizer Name

B. S. W. Barootes

Organizer Affiliation

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies

Presider Name

B. S. W. Barootes

Paper Title 1

The Pearl-Poet and Non-Conformist Religious Ideas in the First Year Seminar

Presenter 1 Name

Felisa Baynes-Ross

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 2

Playing the Manuscript: Teaching the Games of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Presenter 2 Name

Julie Nelson Couch; Kimberly K. Bell

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.; Sam Houston State Univ.

Paper Title 3

An Intertextual Approach to Courtliness and the Divine in Pearl

Presenter 3 Name

Amber Dunai

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Texas A&M Univ.-Central Texas

Paper Title 4

Defamiliarizing the Pearl-Poet: Rejecting Translation and Broadening the Course

Presenter 4 Name

Stephen D. Powell

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Guelph

Paper Title 5

Teaching Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in the Context of Rhetorical and Linguistic Traditions of the Middle Ages

Presenter 5 Name

Scott D. Troyan

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Start Date

10-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1235

Description

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight has long been a mainstay of Brit Lit surveys and introductions to medieval literature. However, the recent anthologising of Pearl, both in the Middle English and in translation, and the rise of pedagogical interest in vernacular religious traditions such as those exemplified by Cleanness and Patience, calls for a fresh appraisal of classroom strategies for approaching these texts. Benjamin Barootes

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Is There a Class in This Text? Teaching the Pearl-Poet (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1235

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight has long been a mainstay of Brit Lit surveys and introductions to medieval literature. However, the recent anthologising of Pearl, both in the Middle English and in translation, and the rise of pedagogical interest in vernacular religious traditions such as those exemplified by Cleanness and Patience, calls for a fresh appraisal of classroom strategies for approaching these texts. Benjamin Barootes