Session Title

New Voices in Medieval History

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Haskins Society

Organizer Name

Nicholas L. Paul

Organizer Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Presider Name

Robert F. Berkhofer III

Presider Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 1

A Slippery Currency: Eels in the Medieval English Economy

Presenter 1 Name

John Wyatt Greenlee

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Cornell Univ.

Paper Title 2

Into the Woods: Falcons as Evidence of Ecological Intervention in the High Middle Ages

Presenter 2 Name

Kyle Madsen

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Boston College

Paper Title 3

Writing Hebrew, Speaking French: Hebrew Translations among Diglossic Jews in Medieval Northern Europe

Presenter 3 Name

Caroline Gruenbaum (Karrer Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 3 Affiliation

New York Univ.

Paper Title 4

Regulating Sex Trade in the Latin East: Comparative Perspectives

Presenter 4 Name

Sean Loritz

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1225

Description

New Voices in Medieval History showcases exciting new research from junior medieval historians. This year's session includes papers related to the use of eels as currency in post-conquest England; falconry and the study of ecology in central and later medieval Europe; the regulation of prostitution and the sex trade in the crusader states (or Latin East); and the translation of Old French romances and fables into Hebrew and the engagement of minority communities with majority culture. Nicholas Paul

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

New Voices in Medieval History

Schneider 1225

New Voices in Medieval History showcases exciting new research from junior medieval historians. This year's session includes papers related to the use of eels as currency in post-conquest England; falconry and the study of ecology in central and later medieval Europe; the regulation of prostitution and the sex trade in the crusader states (or Latin East); and the translation of Old French romances and fables into Hebrew and the engagement of minority communities with majority culture. Nicholas Paul