Session Title

Perceval Continuations (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Arthurian Society, North American Branch (IAS/NAB)

Organizer Name

Joseph M. Sullivan

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Oklahoma

Presider Name

Joseph M. Sullivan

Paper Title 1

Parzival/Perceval in the Medieval German Tradition

Presenter 1 Name

Jon Sherman

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Northern Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 2

At vísu skal ek freista: Perceval in Medieval Scandinavia

Presenter 2 Name

Kevin R. Kritsch

Presenter 2 Affiliation

College of William & Mary

Paper Title 3

Continuing Perchavael in the Middle Dutch Lancelot Compilation

Presenter 3 Name

Marjolein Hogenbirk

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. van Amsterdam

Paper Title 4

Death and Humor in the Middle English Sir Perceval

Presenter 4 Name

Usha Vishnuvajjala

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Tulane Univ.

Paper Title 5

Breaking the Grail Ceiling: Queering Chivalric Masculinity and the Grail Maidens in Malory

Presenter 5 Name

Margaret Sheble

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Paper Title 6

Cinematic Continuations of the Grail Quest: From The Fisher King to Ready Player One

Presenter 6 Name

Kevin J. Harty

Presenter 6 Affiliation

La Salle Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

Percival/Perceval Continuations - Roundtable

Across the broad tradition of medieval Arthurian literature, Sir Perceval (a.k.a Parzival, Perchevael, Parceval, Presivalle, Peredur, etc.) is among the very most central knights of the legendary Round Table, and as the first knight in that tradition to seek the Holy Grail, he became, from the late twelfth century onwards, the most frequent locus for Arthurian authors across Europe to propose both the ideal relationship between the individual knight and his God as well as to explore how the practice of arms might, or might not, be successfully reconciled with the demands of the Christian faith. As Perceval is a dominant figure in all the major medieval Arthurian national traditions—including, for example, the Middle English, the Old Norse, the Middle Dutch, the Old Welsh, the Middle High German, and the Old French—this roundtable will interest a wide spectrum of scholars from numerous linguistic and literary specialties and will cast light upon how authors from the most diverse geographic areas and across several centuries used the same character to project sometimes very different messages about the ideal interplay of knighthood and piety. Lastly, we intend this roundtable to complement the awarding of our society’s “Norris J. Lacy Prize” for outstanding Arthurian scholarship, which we will present at this year’s ICMS to UK researcher Nigel Bryant in recognition of his pioneering work on important texts from the Old French Perceval tradition. - Joseph M. Sullivan

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Perceval Continuations (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1010

Percival/Perceval Continuations - Roundtable

Across the broad tradition of medieval Arthurian literature, Sir Perceval (a.k.a Parzival, Perchevael, Parceval, Presivalle, Peredur, etc.) is among the very most central knights of the legendary Round Table, and as the first knight in that tradition to seek the Holy Grail, he became, from the late twelfth century onwards, the most frequent locus for Arthurian authors across Europe to propose both the ideal relationship between the individual knight and his God as well as to explore how the practice of arms might, or might not, be successfully reconciled with the demands of the Christian faith. As Perceval is a dominant figure in all the major medieval Arthurian national traditions—including, for example, the Middle English, the Old Norse, the Middle Dutch, the Old Welsh, the Middle High German, and the Old French—this roundtable will interest a wide spectrum of scholars from numerous linguistic and literary specialties and will cast light upon how authors from the most diverse geographic areas and across several centuries used the same character to project sometimes very different messages about the ideal interplay of knighthood and piety. Lastly, we intend this roundtable to complement the awarding of our society’s “Norris J. Lacy Prize” for outstanding Arthurian scholarship, which we will present at this year’s ICMS to UK researcher Nigel Bryant in recognition of his pioneering work on important texts from the Old French Perceval tradition. - Joseph M. Sullivan