Session Title

Ethiopian Manuscripts and Manuscript Studies in Honor of Getatchew Haile (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto; Hill Museum&Manuscript Library (HMML)

Organizer Name

Sean M. Winslow; Ted Erho

Organizer Affiliation

Karl-Franzens-Univ. Graz; Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

Presider Name

Suzanne Conklin Akbari

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 1

Recent Textual Discoveries in Medieval Ethiopic Manuscripts

Presenter 1 Name

Ted Erho

Paper Title 2

Forgotten or Feared: The Case of Ethiopian "Magical" Manuscripts

Presenter 2 Name

Gidena Mesfin Kebede

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Technische Univ. Berlin

Paper Title 3

Manuscript Use in Ethiopian Church Service

Presenter 3 Name

Fisseha Tadesse Feleke

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 4

Looking to the Future: Scribes and Manuscripts in Ethiopia

Presenter 4 Name

Sean M. Winslow

Start Date

9-5-2019 7:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2020

Description

Although most surviving Ethiopian manuscripts do not strictly meet traditional dating cut-offs for the medieval period, the riches of this tradition have already been of great interest to scholars of the Bible (Enoch, Jubilees), studies of transnational literatures (the Ethiopic version of the Alexander romance), and historians of craft traditions (since the scribal tradition survives to the present day). This session will bring together cataloguers, historians of scribal practice, biblical historians, and art historians, to talk about the current state of the field of Ethiopian Manuscript Studies, and discuss its place in the larger field of manuscript studies. Sean M. Winslow

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May 9th, 7:30 PM

Ethiopian Manuscripts and Manuscript Studies in Honor of Getatchew Haile (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 2020

Although most surviving Ethiopian manuscripts do not strictly meet traditional dating cut-offs for the medieval period, the riches of this tradition have already been of great interest to scholars of the Bible (Enoch, Jubilees), studies of transnational literatures (the Ethiopic version of the Alexander romance), and historians of craft traditions (since the scribal tradition survives to the present day). This session will bring together cataloguers, historians of scribal practice, biblical historians, and art historians, to talk about the current state of the field of Ethiopian Manuscript Studies, and discuss its place in the larger field of manuscript studies. Sean M. Winslow