Session Title

Medieval Art History: Are We Post-Theoretical?

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Gerry Guest

Organizer Affiliation

John Carroll Univ.

Presider Name

Karen Eileen Overbey

Presider Affiliation

Tufts Univ.

Paper Title 1

Reconsidering "the Law of the Frame" and the Tympanum of Saint-Lazare of Autun

Presenter 1 Name

Momo Kanazawa

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Tokai Univ.

Paper Title 2

Other Spaces: Medieval Architectural History between Theory and Practice

Presenter 2 Name

Zachary Stewart

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Texas A&M Univ.

Paper Title 3

A Queerer Très Riches Heures

Presenter 3 Name

Gerry Guest

Start Date

9-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1350

Description

The philosopher and blogger Levi Bryant has written that theory “is a sort of strange work that precedes anything true, allowing that which does not appear to appear. There is never a simple gaze or seeing, but rather there is always an apparatus that allows something to appear that would not otherwise appear. And there is no looking nor acting that doesn’t presuppose an apparatus of appearance.” If we follow this line of thought, then all medievalists are theorists. Yet, in the 21st century, historians of medieval art seem largely indifferent to the field of critical theory, which profoundly marked the study of the humanities in the 20th century. If a generation ago scholars were concerned with defining something called “the new art history,” where do we stand now? Are we now working in a post-theoretical age or can a renewed engagement with theoretical issues enliven the field? Gerry Guest

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Art History: Are We Post-Theoretical?

Schneider 1350

The philosopher and blogger Levi Bryant has written that theory “is a sort of strange work that precedes anything true, allowing that which does not appear to appear. There is never a simple gaze or seeing, but rather there is always an apparatus that allows something to appear that would not otherwise appear. And there is no looking nor acting that doesn’t presuppose an apparatus of appearance.” If we follow this line of thought, then all medievalists are theorists. Yet, in the 21st century, historians of medieval art seem largely indifferent to the field of critical theory, which profoundly marked the study of the humanities in the 20th century. If a generation ago scholars were concerned with defining something called “the new art history,” where do we stand now? Are we now working in a post-theoretical age or can a renewed engagement with theoretical issues enliven the field? Gerry Guest