Session Title

Beyond Cadfael: Medieval Medicine in Popular Culture

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Lucy Barnhouse

Organizer Affiliation

Wartburg College

Presider Name

Lucy Barnhouse

Paper Title 1

Global Use of Mugwort in Popular Culture: Its Fumigation Treatment in the Trotula and Modern Korean Culture

Presenter 1 Name

Minji Lee

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 2

Mystically Altered: Medical Medievalism in Crusader Kings II

Presenter 2 Name

Cai Henderson

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 3

"Have you come here to play Jesus?": The Use and Misuse of Leprosy in Modern Media

Presenter 3 Name

Courtney A. Krolikoski

Presenter 3 Affiliation

McGill Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

Popular stereotypes of the medical and the medieval have often been at odds. As François-Olivier Touati and other historians of premodern medicine have observed, the Middle Ages is frequently imagined as a time essentially characterized by the inescapable prevalence of disease. Medicine, on the other hand, is conceptualized — particularly in western media — as belonging to the modern, the clinical, and the professional. Medieval medicine is often portrayed in popular media as marginal, primitive, or both. This panel examines both continuities between medieval and modern medicine, and how popular portrayals of medicine in the medieval world reinforce or complicate the binary of the medieval and the modern. Lucy Barnhouse

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Beyond Cadfael: Medieval Medicine in Popular Culture

Bernhard 204

Popular stereotypes of the medical and the medieval have often been at odds. As François-Olivier Touati and other historians of premodern medicine have observed, the Middle Ages is frequently imagined as a time essentially characterized by the inescapable prevalence of disease. Medicine, on the other hand, is conceptualized — particularly in western media — as belonging to the modern, the clinical, and the professional. Medieval medicine is often portrayed in popular media as marginal, primitive, or both. This panel examines both continuities between medieval and modern medicine, and how popular portrayals of medicine in the medieval world reinforce or complicate the binary of the medieval and the modern. Lucy Barnhouse