Session Title

"Big Data" in Medieval Studies II: Corpus Exploration

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Digital Philology: A Journal of Medieval Cultures

Organizer Name

Albert Lloret

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst

Presider Name

Susanna Allés-Torrent

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Miami

Paper Title 1

What Can “Big Data” Tell Us about Medieval Intertextuality? A Look at Old English Verse

Presenter 1 Name

Paul Battles

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Hanover College

Paper Title 2

Visualizing Communication and Prosopographical Networks of Edward I Using the Petitionary Texts of TNA, SC 8

Presenter 2 Name

James B. Harr III

Presenter 2 Affiliation

North Carolina State Univ.

Paper Title 3

Medieval MALLET Mishaps: Topic Modeling Difficult Corpora

Presenter 3 Name

David Mimno; Laure Thompson; Anna Fore Waymack

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Cornell Univ.; Cornell Univ.; Cornell Univ.

Paper Title 4

Using the Computer to READ and Search Medieval Documents

Presenter 4 Name

Tobias Hodel; Maria Kallio

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Staatsarchiv des Kantons Zürich; Kansallisarkisto

Start Date

9-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

The creation of digital collections of texts, or textual corpora, for research and preservation may be one of the seminal technological innovations in the digital humanities that still remains at the core of many text-oriented disciplines, including those belonging to medieval studies. Once a textual corpus is created, quantitative analyses allow researchers to study texts from a variety of critical perspectives and methodologies, including text recognition, topic modeling, the analysis of networks and intertextuality. Albert Lloret

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

"Big Data" in Medieval Studies II: Corpus Exploration

Bernhard 210

The creation of digital collections of texts, or textual corpora, for research and preservation may be one of the seminal technological innovations in the digital humanities that still remains at the core of many text-oriented disciplines, including those belonging to medieval studies. Once a textual corpus is created, quantitative analyses allow researchers to study texts from a variety of critical perspectives and methodologies, including text recognition, topic modeling, the analysis of networks and intertextuality. Albert Lloret