Session Title

Romance at Sea I: Sea Creatures

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Romance Society

Organizer Name

Rebecca Drake

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of York

Presider Name

Asa Simon Mittman

Presider Affiliation

California State Univ.-Chico

Paper Title 1

An Amphibious Knight: Charting the Oceanological Ebb and Flow of Romance Narrative in Torrent of Portyngale

Presenter 1 Name

Andrew M. Richmond

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Southern Connecticut State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Cetacean Relations: Whales in Medieval Romance and Science

Presenter 2 Name

Aylin Malcolm

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 3

Motherhood at Sea in Medieval Romance

Presenter 3 Name

Kirsty Bolton

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Southampton

Start Date

9-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneiner 2345

Description

This session discusses creatures at sea, from traditional sea monsters, to mothers cast adrift, and humans existing in coastal or island environments. As well as seeking to understand the relationship between the human and their natural environment, it questions how individual identity, removed from central human society, is changed at sea. What kind of monsters can be found at sea? How does the sea manifest difference between masculinity and femininity? What are the struggles and dangers of living by, or upon, the sea? We invite discussion of these themes in response to a session of three papers. Rebecca Drake

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Romance at Sea I: Sea Creatures

Schneiner 2345

This session discusses creatures at sea, from traditional sea monsters, to mothers cast adrift, and humans existing in coastal or island environments. As well as seeking to understand the relationship between the human and their natural environment, it questions how individual identity, removed from central human society, is changed at sea. What kind of monsters can be found at sea? How does the sea manifest difference between masculinity and femininity? What are the struggles and dangers of living by, or upon, the sea? We invite discussion of these themes in response to a session of three papers. Rebecca Drake