Session Title

Animal Crimes

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Association for Robin Hood Studies (IARHS)

Organizer Name

Melissa Ridley Elmes

Organizer Affiliation

Lindenwood Univ.

Presider Name

Melissa Ridley Elmes

Paper Title 1

Reading Legal Bodies: Interrogating the Animal Trials as Literary Scholars

Presenter 1 Name

Crystal N. Beamer

Presenter 1 Affiliation

McMaster Univ.

Paper Title 2

Objectification and Non-Human Execution in Fifteenth-Century Flanders

Presenter 2 Name

Mireille Pardon

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 3

Premodern Animal Trials and the Question of the Human-Animal Divide

Presenter 3 Name

Anna Czarnowus

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Silesia

Paper Title 4

The Green “Mayster Herte”: The Deer as Iconic Object and Perpetrator of Crime in Select Robin Hood Narratives and Film

Presenter 4 Name

Lorraine Kochanske Stock

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Houston

Start Date

11-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1120

Description

Outlaws and outlawry are commonly associated with the human; yet, throughout the medieval period, animals were both the subject of crime, as when they were stolen, maimed, or killed, and its perpetrator; for example, the sow and piglets put on trial for murder for killing a 5-year old boy in Savigny, France in 1457. Documented legal trials from a variety of cultures featuring pigs, goats, horses, dogs and cows suggest that medieval understandings of the moral agency, ethics, and politics of outlaws and outlawry was decidedly not simply a human affair, but extended to our animal counterparts. Papers might consider the historically-documented or literary or textual (re)imagining of a trial or set of trials featuring an animal or animals; how animals interact with outlaw humans; the moral agency of animals on trial; the ethics of putting animals on trial; the ethics of outlawing animals; how animals can be constructed as outlaws philosophically, legally, or by other means, how and where animals appear in laws, the treatment of animal outlaws, animal exiles, and similar. Melissa Elmes

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 11th, 3:30 PM

Animal Crimes

Schneider 1120

Outlaws and outlawry are commonly associated with the human; yet, throughout the medieval period, animals were both the subject of crime, as when they were stolen, maimed, or killed, and its perpetrator; for example, the sow and piglets put on trial for murder for killing a 5-year old boy in Savigny, France in 1457. Documented legal trials from a variety of cultures featuring pigs, goats, horses, dogs and cows suggest that medieval understandings of the moral agency, ethics, and politics of outlaws and outlawry was decidedly not simply a human affair, but extended to our animal counterparts. Papers might consider the historically-documented or literary or textual (re)imagining of a trial or set of trials featuring an animal or animals; how animals interact with outlaw humans; the moral agency of animals on trial; the ethics of putting animals on trial; the ethics of outlawing animals; how animals can be constructed as outlaws philosophically, legally, or by other means, how and where animals appear in laws, the treatment of animal outlaws, animal exiles, and similar. Melissa Elmes