Session Title

Rhetorics of Resistance

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Association for Robin Hood Studies (IARHS)

Organizer Name

Lydia Yaitsky Kertz

Organizer Affiliation

SUNY-Geneseo

Presider Name

Lydia Yaitsky Kertz

Paper Title 1

The Liminal Hero: Reinscribing the Codes of Justice through Spatiality in Medieval Outlaw Tales

Presenter 1 Name

Robert Shane Farris

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Saskatchewan

Paper Title 2

The Sheriff in the Greenwood: Naturalizing Resistance in A Lytell Geste of Robyn Hode

Presenter 2 Name

Christian Sheridan

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Bridgewater College

Paper Title 3

Mountains as Green Wood in the Story of Hong Gildong, the "Korean Robin Hood"

Presenter 3 Name

Michael Evans

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Delta College

Start Date

10-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1245

Description

Though banished from society for real or alleged crimes, the deeds of outlaws are celebrated in popular narratives and ballads. Marginalized figures, they exist on the fringes of civilization in an adversarial relationship with the representatives of the law. In this session, we will address the political status of the Green Wood as a rhetorical concept of "safe harbor," a refuge for the displaced, the ostracized, and the dispossessed. We welcome papers on medieval narratives and ballads of such celebrated outlaws as Robin Hood, Hereward, Eustace the Monk, and Fouke Fitz Waryn, among others, and aim to address the ethical, political, and ecological issues raised by the rhetoric of this body of medieval literature. Collectively, the session and its participants will consider how outlaw rhetoric comments upon the justice system and its representatives, thereby formulating a medieval rhetoric of resistance. Melissa Ridley Elmes

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Rhetorics of Resistance

Schneider 1245

Though banished from society for real or alleged crimes, the deeds of outlaws are celebrated in popular narratives and ballads. Marginalized figures, they exist on the fringes of civilization in an adversarial relationship with the representatives of the law. In this session, we will address the political status of the Green Wood as a rhetorical concept of "safe harbor," a refuge for the displaced, the ostracized, and the dispossessed. We welcome papers on medieval narratives and ballads of such celebrated outlaws as Robin Hood, Hereward, Eustace the Monk, and Fouke Fitz Waryn, among others, and aim to address the ethical, political, and ecological issues raised by the rhetoric of this body of medieval literature. Collectively, the session and its participants will consider how outlaw rhetoric comments upon the justice system and its representatives, thereby formulating a medieval rhetoric of resistance. Melissa Ridley Elmes