Session Title

Inscribed Desires: Juridical Acts, Graphic Communities, and the Making of Medieval Documents, ca. 1100-1300

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Haskins Society

Organizer Name

Nicholas L. Paul

Organizer Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Presider Name

Laura L. Gathagan

Presider Affiliation

SUNY-Cortland

Paper Title 1

Graphic Communities: Toward the Creation of a Concept

Presenter 1 Name

Paul Bertrand

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. catholique de Louvain

Paper Title 2

Charters: The Formulaic Elements as a Window into Northern French Nobles' Legal Mentalité

Presenter 2 Name

Heather J. Tanner

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Paper Title 3

"Volo pergere Yspania contra paganos": Documents as Sources for the Spread of Crusading Ideals into Spain during the Early Twelfth Century

Presenter 3 Name

James Doherty

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Leeds

Start Date

12-5-2019 8:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 106

Description

Since the publication of Michael Clancy’s classic 1979 study From Memory to Written Record, historians of the central Middle Ages have grappled with the major questions and problems it raised about the processes of documentary production, the intellectual claims of those documents to leave an accurate record for posterity, and the negotiation that they represented between oral and written cultures. The Haskins Society proposes a session addressing the various challenges that confront the historian utilizing medieval documentary sources. Timed to correspond with the publication of the English translation of Paul Bertrand’s landmark study Écritures Ordinaires: Sociologie d’un temps de révolution documentaire, this session invites scholars to re-evaluate the functioning of what Bertrand has branded the « graphic communities » of medieval Europe. Nicholas Paul

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May 12th, 8:30 AM

Inscribed Desires: Juridical Acts, Graphic Communities, and the Making of Medieval Documents, ca. 1100-1300

Bernhard 106

Since the publication of Michael Clancy’s classic 1979 study From Memory to Written Record, historians of the central Middle Ages have grappled with the major questions and problems it raised about the processes of documentary production, the intellectual claims of those documents to leave an accurate record for posterity, and the negotiation that they represented between oral and written cultures. The Haskins Society proposes a session addressing the various challenges that confront the historian utilizing medieval documentary sources. Timed to correspond with the publication of the English translation of Paul Bertrand’s landmark study Écritures Ordinaires: Sociologie d’un temps de révolution documentaire, this session invites scholars to re-evaluate the functioning of what Bertrand has branded the « graphic communities » of medieval Europe. Nicholas Paul