Session Title

Women Healers in Medieval Family and Community Life

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

William H. York

Organizer Affiliation

Portland State Univ.

Presider Name

Linda Migl Keyser

Presider Affiliation

Medica

Paper Title 1

Theodora and the Mystery of Justinian's Cure, Solved

Presenter 1 Name

Ruth Dwyer

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Paper Title 2

Hildegard's Heterodoxy: Sources and the Application of Lapidary Knowledge in Physica

Presenter 2 Name

Nichola Harris

Presenter 2 Affiliation

SUNY-Ulster

Start Date

9-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1160

Description

Both historical and fictional, textual and artistic representations portray medieval women performing a customary domestic responsibility, treating illness and injury among their family and neighbors. This session seeks papers that enlarge typical characterizations by offering insight into the contributions and practices of female healers as they functioned in the day-day reality of medieval life. Not limited to midwifery, the health care activities of medieval laywomen, noblewomen, and religious women included surgery and bloodletting, therapeutic treatments, herbalism, practical nursing, and disposal of the dead. Paper proposals are invited that examine training, treatments, historical records, legal status, and individual figures, both professional and non-professional. In addition, papers are encouraged to examine the textual and empirical sources of information employed by medieval female healers, such as botanicals, late medieval self-help texts, medical texts and teaching manuals, traditional home recipe texts, native intelligence, and apprenticeships. As in the past, Medica encourages interdisciplinary perspectives that explore medieval female health care providers across the cultural spectrum of history, literature, and art. William H. York

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Women Healers in Medieval Family and Community Life

Schneider 1160

Both historical and fictional, textual and artistic representations portray medieval women performing a customary domestic responsibility, treating illness and injury among their family and neighbors. This session seeks papers that enlarge typical characterizations by offering insight into the contributions and practices of female healers as they functioned in the day-day reality of medieval life. Not limited to midwifery, the health care activities of medieval laywomen, noblewomen, and religious women included surgery and bloodletting, therapeutic treatments, herbalism, practical nursing, and disposal of the dead. Paper proposals are invited that examine training, treatments, historical records, legal status, and individual figures, both professional and non-professional. In addition, papers are encouraged to examine the textual and empirical sources of information employed by medieval female healers, such as botanicals, late medieval self-help texts, medical texts and teaching manuals, traditional home recipe texts, native intelligence, and apprenticeships. As in the past, Medica encourages interdisciplinary perspectives that explore medieval female health care providers across the cultural spectrum of history, literature, and art. William H. York