Session Title

Nevertheless, She Resisted: Centering Female Will and Consent in Medieval Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Organizer Name

Alison Langdon

Organizer Affiliation

Western Kentucky Univ.

Presider Name

Alison Langdon

Paper Title 1

"The Drake, Stroyer of His Owne Kinde": Feminine Will in The Parliament of Fowls

Presenter 1 Name

Kristin Bovaird-Abbo

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Northern Colorado

Paper Title 2

"In myn armes I had her faste": Rape and Its Undercurrents in The Isle of Ladies

Presenter 2 Name

Boyda J. Johnstone

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Paper Title 3

Que si faire li plot: Toxic Masculinity, Erased Consent, and the Making of a Queen in Chrétien de Troyes's Erec et Enide

Presenter 3 Name

Elizabeth S. Leet

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Franklin & Marshall College

Paper Title 4

Negotiating Survival: Women's Strategies of Resistance in Premodern Rape Lyrics

Presenter 4 Name

Carissa M. Harris

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Temple Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2019 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 208

Description

Rape in medieval literature often functions as a “chivalric necessity,” a means of articulating masculine identity that elides or ignores questions of female bodily sovereignty in favor of the male protagonist’s development. Yet we also find instances where texts implicitly or explicitly call attention to the act of rape as a violation of female will. This session seeks papers exploring narratives of resistance in medieval texts that recenter will and consent in portrayals of rape. Alison Langdon

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 10:30 AM

Nevertheless, She Resisted: Centering Female Will and Consent in Medieval Literature

Bernhard 208

Rape in medieval literature often functions as a “chivalric necessity,” a means of articulating masculine identity that elides or ignores questions of female bodily sovereignty in favor of the male protagonist’s development. Yet we also find instances where texts implicitly or explicitly call attention to the act of rape as a violation of female will. This session seeks papers exploring narratives of resistance in medieval texts that recenter will and consent in portrayals of rape. Alison Langdon