Session Title

Digital Maps and Mapping

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of Place and Space (MAPS)

Organizer Name

Matthew Boyd Goldie

Organizer Affiliation

Rider Univ.

Presider Name

Matthew Boyd Goldie

Paper Title 1

Climates of Change: GIS, Digital Mapping, and 3D Modeling in Late Medieval Sussex

Presenter 1 Name

Steven Bednarski; Zack MacDonald

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Waterloo; St. Jerome's Univ., Univ. of Waterloo

Paper Title 2

Castles in the Sky: Building Worlds and Measuring Space in Medieval French Literary Texts

Presenter 2 Name

Paula Leverage

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Paper Title 3

Overcoming the Perils of Mapping Medieval Spaces: GIS and Other Data Visualizations of the Literary Real and Fictive

Presenter 3 Name

John A. Geck

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland

Paper Title 4

Marking Up Ambiguous and Imaginary Places

Presenter 4 Name

Sean M. Winslow

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Karl-Franzens-Univ. Graz

Start Date

10-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

What are medieval data? How qualitatively rich can digital information be, and what kinds of texts can or should be mapped? How is the visual presentation of data different from a written account? Are there useful ways to map non-specific or non-geographic spaces, and are there compelling reasons to do so? This session discusses the challenges in building platforms for medieval geodata, such as geographic information systems (GIS) for the presentation of data on maps and in other graphic forms. Panelists examine, theoretically and otherwise, the approaches and results of presenting geoinformation for medieval studies. Papers explore how GIS and other digital projects can produce new findings and investigate potential shortcomings. Analysis includes theorizations of geoinformatics, space more generally, and geographical and imaginary spaces—Matthew Boyd Goldie

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Digital Maps and Mapping

Fetzer 2030

What are medieval data? How qualitatively rich can digital information be, and what kinds of texts can or should be mapped? How is the visual presentation of data different from a written account? Are there useful ways to map non-specific or non-geographic spaces, and are there compelling reasons to do so? This session discusses the challenges in building platforms for medieval geodata, such as geographic information systems (GIS) for the presentation of data on maps and in other graphic forms. Panelists examine, theoretically and otherwise, the approaches and results of presenting geoinformation for medieval studies. Papers explore how GIS and other digital projects can produce new findings and investigate potential shortcomings. Analysis includes theorizations of geoinformatics, space more generally, and geographical and imaginary spaces—Matthew Boyd Goldie