Session Title

Otto Bathurst's Robin Hood 2018 (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Society for the Study of Medievalism

Organizer Name

Usha Vishnuvajjala

Organizer Affiliation

Tulane Univ.

Presider Name

Steven Bruso

Presider Affiliation

Endicott College

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Alexander L. Kaufman

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Ball State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Austin A. Deray

Presenter 2 Affiliation

George Mason Univ.

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Lauryn S. Mayer

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Washington & Jefferson College

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Sabina Rahman

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Macquarie Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2016

Description

This roundtable discussion will think through the various medievalisms and intertextualities present in Otto Bathhurst’s film Robin Hood, to be released in November 2018. The film continues some of the same features as Guy Ritchie’s recent King Arthur film—an outlaw masculinity that depends in part on self-deprecating humor, racial diversity, female characters framed by the filmmaker as “strong,” and the casting of actors who appear in other popular medievalist or neomedievalist films, such as Taron Edgerton of Kingsman: Secret Service fame. Speakers may consider topics such as the film’s intertextual relationship with other medievalist films, the relationship between its outlaw ethos and current political events, and its depiction of masculinity. Usha Vishnuvajjala

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Otto Bathurst's Robin Hood 2018 (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 2016

This roundtable discussion will think through the various medievalisms and intertextualities present in Otto Bathhurst’s film Robin Hood, to be released in November 2018. The film continues some of the same features as Guy Ritchie’s recent King Arthur film—an outlaw masculinity that depends in part on self-deprecating humor, racial diversity, female characters framed by the filmmaker as “strong,” and the casting of actors who appear in other popular medievalist or neomedievalist films, such as Taron Edgerton of Kingsman: Secret Service fame. Speakers may consider topics such as the film’s intertextual relationship with other medievalist films, the relationship between its outlaw ethos and current political events, and its depiction of masculinity. Usha Vishnuvajjala