Session Title

Stronger Together: Strategies for Collaboration in Old English Studies (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Old English Forum, Modern Language Association

Organizer Name

Renée R. Trilling

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Presider Name

Matthew T. Hussey

Presider Affiliation

Simon Fraser Univ.

Paper Title 1

Opportunistic Collaboration: Some Strategies, Some Successes, and at Least One (Near) Disaster

Presenter 1 Name

Kristen Carella

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Assumption College

Paper Title 2

Stranger Together: New Horizons for Old English

Presenter 2 Name

Carl Kears; James L. Paz

Presenter 2 Affiliation

King's College London; Univ. of Manchester

Paper Title 3

Beowulf by All

Presenter 3 Name

Jeanie Abbott

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 4

Writing at the Gates of Difference: Collaborative Writing and Monstrous Affiliation

Presenter 4 Name

Asa Simon Mittman; Susan M. Kim

Presenter 4 Affiliation

California State Univ.-Chico; Illinois State Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

Collaborative work has always had a home in Old English studies: think Colgrave and Mynors, Greenfield and Calder, Mitchell and Robinson, Lees and Overing. These names are shorthand for the foundational work that the partnerships contributed to our field, but their model, so far, has been the exception rather than the rule for work on Old English and early medieval England. As the trend in humanities scholarship turns more and more toward collaboration, scholars in all fields seek ways to enrich their intellectual lives by joining forces with others whose interests and methodologies overlap and complement one another. Collaborative ventures can take many forms: team teaching, co-authoring an article or a volume, developing a research group, or organizing conferences. They can bring together scholars from different institutions and across period or disciplinary boundaries. And, importantly, they can provide opportunities for funding that are not available to scholars working alone. Most crucially, they can build and strengthen collegial networks that have the capacity to broaden participation in our field, as well as enabling us to extend our work to new and more diverse audiences.

We propose a round table to discuss methods and strategies for launching and maintaining collaborative work in early medieval English. Building on a successful discussion at the 53rd Congress on networks and mentoring in Old English studies, we aim to broaden that conversation and to present a variety of models for working collaboratively both inside our field and with colleagues in other areas of study. Panelists will address a range of questions, such as: what is it like to write collaboratively? How can individual scholars forge connections that allow for collaboration? How might collaboration offer new possibilities for ways to engage with our objects of study? Renée R. Trilling

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Stronger Together: Strategies for Collaboration in Old English Studies (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1005

Collaborative work has always had a home in Old English studies: think Colgrave and Mynors, Greenfield and Calder, Mitchell and Robinson, Lees and Overing. These names are shorthand for the foundational work that the partnerships contributed to our field, but their model, so far, has been the exception rather than the rule for work on Old English and early medieval England. As the trend in humanities scholarship turns more and more toward collaboration, scholars in all fields seek ways to enrich their intellectual lives by joining forces with others whose interests and methodologies overlap and complement one another. Collaborative ventures can take many forms: team teaching, co-authoring an article or a volume, developing a research group, or organizing conferences. They can bring together scholars from different institutions and across period or disciplinary boundaries. And, importantly, they can provide opportunities for funding that are not available to scholars working alone. Most crucially, they can build and strengthen collegial networks that have the capacity to broaden participation in our field, as well as enabling us to extend our work to new and more diverse audiences.

We propose a round table to discuss methods and strategies for launching and maintaining collaborative work in early medieval English. Building on a successful discussion at the 53rd Congress on networks and mentoring in Old English studies, we aim to broaden that conversation and to present a variety of models for working collaboratively both inside our field and with colleagues in other areas of study. Panelists will address a range of questions, such as: what is it like to write collaboratively? How can individual scholars forge connections that allow for collaboration? How might collaboration offer new possibilities for ways to engage with our objects of study? Renée R. Trilling