Session Title

Mappings: Pictura et Scriptura on/and Medieval Maps

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Dan Terkla

Organizer Affiliation

Illinois Wesleyan Univ.

Presider Name

Caroline Palmer

Presider Affiliation

Boydell & Brewer, Ltd.

Paper Title 1

The Tenth-Century Iconografia Rateriana and the Medieval Urban Imagination

Presenter 1 Name

Meredith Fluke

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Wellesley College

Paper Title 2

Unflolding, Turning, Traveling: On the Mediality of Pilgrim Maps of the Fifteenth Century

Presenter 2 Name

Raoul Marc Etienne DuBois

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. Zürich

Paper Title 3

Itineraria Tesselata: An Interpretation of Two Topographic Mosaics from Late Antique Jordan

Presenter 3 Name

Tracey Eckersley

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Louisville

Start Date

12-5-2019 8:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 205

Description

The extent to which medieval mapmakers used words and images to re-present their world varies from map to map and from one map type to another. There are verbal maps, schematic maps, maps that are primarily pictorial, and still others that provide viewers with complex word-and-image information hybrids. Speakers in this session discuss one of the following, or various combinations thereof: the ways in which different types of maps would have been presented to and understood by their medieval viewers, what information those maps conveyed to those viewers, ways in which their words and/or images conveyed that information, and to what ends various map types were paired with texts. Dan Terkla

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 8:30 AM

Mappings: Pictura et Scriptura on/and Medieval Maps

Bernhard 205

The extent to which medieval mapmakers used words and images to re-present their world varies from map to map and from one map type to another. There are verbal maps, schematic maps, maps that are primarily pictorial, and still others that provide viewers with complex word-and-image information hybrids. Speakers in this session discuss one of the following, or various combinations thereof: the ways in which different types of maps would have been presented to and understood by their medieval viewers, what information those maps conveyed to those viewers, ways in which their words and/or images conveyed that information, and to what ends various map types were paired with texts. Dan Terkla