Session Title

The Anxiety of Influence

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Alain Chartier Society; International Christine de Pizan Society, North American Branch

Organizer Name

Daisy Delogu

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Presider Name

Anne-Hélène Miller

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville

Paper Title 1

"Except I Wash You": Jean Gerson's Theology of Penance and the Confessional Poems in the Cycle of the Belle dame sans mercy

Presenter 1 Name

Linda Burke

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Elmhurst College

Paper Title 2

Christine de Pizan against Paul the Apostle in Cité des dames and Trois Vertus

Presenter 2 Name

Margaret M. Gower

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame

Paper Title 3

Christine de Pizan's "Lais": from the Musical "Viel Forge" to Textual Poetry

Presenter 3 Name

Mathias Sieffert

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 211

Description

This session of papers reflects on the ways in which late medieval authors cite existing writers or works without necessarily naming them, mis-cite or mis-characterize the work of others, creatively transform, repurpose, or subvert literary texts or traditions. Papers examine how the works of authors such as (but not limited to) Christine de Pizan and Alain Chartier were translated, adapted, copied, or printed in ways that purposefully obscured the connection between author and text. We are interested in the spectral presence of authors and texts in works that do not acknowledge them, in how writers craft their own intellectual genealogies and reputations through techniques of citation and/or repression, and in the textual afterlives of authors such as Chartier and de Pizan. Daisy Delogu

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

The Anxiety of Influence

Bernhard 211

This session of papers reflects on the ways in which late medieval authors cite existing writers or works without necessarily naming them, mis-cite or mis-characterize the work of others, creatively transform, repurpose, or subvert literary texts or traditions. Papers examine how the works of authors such as (but not limited to) Christine de Pizan and Alain Chartier were translated, adapted, copied, or printed in ways that purposefully obscured the connection between author and text. We are interested in the spectral presence of authors and texts in works that do not acknowledge them, in how writers craft their own intellectual genealogies and reputations through techniques of citation and/or repression, and in the textual afterlives of authors such as Chartier and de Pizan. Daisy Delogu