Session Title

Medieval Languages and Linguistics

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for Medieval Languages and Linguistics

Organizer Name

Andrew C. Troup

Organizer Affiliation

California State Univ.-Bakersfield

Presider Name

Paul A. Johnston Jr.

Presider Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 1

Arriving and Departing in Time: Spatiotemporal Metaphor in Old English

Presenter 1 Name

Mark Sundaram

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Laurentian Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Old English Relative Pronoun: Grammatical Clarity or Rhetorical Emphasis?

Presenter 2 Name

Andrew C. Troup

Paper Title 3

The Language of The Kingis Quair: Another Look

Presenter 3 Name

William F. Hodapp

Presenter 3 Affiliation

College of St. Scholastica

Start Date

11-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1160

Description

More and more linguists in recent years have been applying the theories of Noam Chomsky, Paul Kiparsky, Roger Lass, and others to the study of medieval languages: Old and Middle English, Old French, Old Occitan, Old and Middle German, Old Norse, etc. The results have been excitingly fruitful—and yet messy. The messiness results from the lack of native speakers to interview. In this session, we will present papers that analyze phonological, morphological, and syntactic data within a socio-historical context. We will discuss the difficulty of making firm conclusions with the types of language data available to us. Andrew C. Troup

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Languages and Linguistics

Schneider 1160

More and more linguists in recent years have been applying the theories of Noam Chomsky, Paul Kiparsky, Roger Lass, and others to the study of medieval languages: Old and Middle English, Old French, Old Occitan, Old and Middle German, Old Norse, etc. The results have been excitingly fruitful—and yet messy. The messiness results from the lack of native speakers to interview. In this session, we will present papers that analyze phonological, morphological, and syntactic data within a socio-historical context. We will discuss the difficulty of making firm conclusions with the types of language data available to us. Andrew C. Troup