Session Title

Medieval Song, Verse, and Versification in Tolkien's Works

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Annie Brust

Organizer Affiliation

Kent State Univ.

Presider Name

Annie Brust

Paper Title 1

Noldorin and Sindarin Verse in the Lord of the Rings

Presenter 1 Name

Eileen Marie Moore

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Cleveland State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Boethian Philosophy and Splintered Music: Decay through Time in Tolkien's Legendarium

Presenter 2 Name

Brad Eden

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

Tolkien, the Beowulf-Poet, and the Phenomenology of Song and Identity

Presenter 3 Name

Paul Fortunato

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Houston-Downtown

Start Date

11-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2016

Description

Richard Firth Green’s recently published study, Elf Queens and Holy Friars: Fairy Beliefs and the Medieval Church, illuminates the prevalence of fairy culture within the Medieval landscape and especially its heightened influence upon medieval religion and literature. J.R.R. Tolkien capitalizes on these influences through his vast academic knowledge of medieval verse and legend, especially that of fairy culture and elven lore, to create his original fiction and scholarly translations. Tolkien’s works explore the concepts of medieval polyphony and homophony in creating a chant-like arrangement of fairy and elven song, to elucidate the musical device and instruments as a function of language. Tolkien utilizes the construction of original Germanic, Irish, and Scottish folklore and verse, through the languages such as Sindarin and Quenya and the cultures of the Rohirrim and Bree-men, to convey complex lineage and theme, much like those expressed in prominent medieval works such as Song of Roland, Beowulf, and from Arthurian legend. In Tolkien’s attempt to recreate a history for England, his celebration of elven and fairy culture—in particular the music and song—recreates a oral history through musical device and such examples as “Lament for Theoden”, “Song of the Mounds of Mundberg”, and “Galadriel’s song” celebrating the narrative of heroic deeds of its characters. This session seeks papers that discuss and explore the importance of elven lore and fairy culture/song on medieval life but also its recreation and significance in Tolkien’s Legendarium and medieval translations.

Annie Brust

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Medieval Song, Verse, and Versification in Tolkien's Works

Fetzer 2016

Richard Firth Green’s recently published study, Elf Queens and Holy Friars: Fairy Beliefs and the Medieval Church, illuminates the prevalence of fairy culture within the Medieval landscape and especially its heightened influence upon medieval religion and literature. J.R.R. Tolkien capitalizes on these influences through his vast academic knowledge of medieval verse and legend, especially that of fairy culture and elven lore, to create his original fiction and scholarly translations. Tolkien’s works explore the concepts of medieval polyphony and homophony in creating a chant-like arrangement of fairy and elven song, to elucidate the musical device and instruments as a function of language. Tolkien utilizes the construction of original Germanic, Irish, and Scottish folklore and verse, through the languages such as Sindarin and Quenya and the cultures of the Rohirrim and Bree-men, to convey complex lineage and theme, much like those expressed in prominent medieval works such as Song of Roland, Beowulf, and from Arthurian legend. In Tolkien’s attempt to recreate a history for England, his celebration of elven and fairy culture—in particular the music and song—recreates a oral history through musical device and such examples as “Lament for Theoden”, “Song of the Mounds of Mundberg”, and “Galadriel’s song” celebrating the narrative of heroic deeds of its characters. This session seeks papers that discuss and explore the importance of elven lore and fairy culture/song on medieval life but also its recreation and significance in Tolkien’s Legendarium and medieval translations.

Annie Brust