Session Title

The Cultures of Georgia and Armenia

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Rare Book Dept., The Free Library of Philadelphia

Organizer Name

Bert Beynen

Organizer Affiliation

Temple Univ.

Presider Name

Sergio La Porta

Presider Affiliation

California State Univ.-Fresno

Paper Title 1

Material Evidence of the Eleventh-Century Armenian Migration to Southern Pontus

Presenter 1 Name

Polina Ivanova

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Paper Title 2

Psalm 120:5 and Its Historical Significance for the Kartvelian Tribes

Presenter 2 Name

Constantine B. Lerner

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem

Paper Title 3

The Typology of Old Testament Georgian Manuscripts and Their Textual History

Presenter 3 Name

Alessandro Maria Bruni

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Ca’ Foscari Univ. Venezia

Paper Title 4

Re-Reading the Rose and Nightingale: Patterns in Medieval Anatolian Literary Production

Presenter 4 Name

Michael B. Pifer

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Start Date

11-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1245

Description

Pifer sheds new light on Kostandin Erznkatsi's The Rose and the Nightingale: they are meant to be read as signifiers for Christ and Gabriel's horn, respectively. Though scholars have generally focused on the "conversion" of the rose and nightingale (bulbul) from Islamicate poetry to a Christian milieu, this paper places Kostandin's exegesis in a comparative context. Others, including Jalal al-Din Rumi, likewise sought to teach audiences to discard outer narrative forms and seek the inner "secrets" within a text. Pifer argues that a common mode of engaging with audiences, and adapting the literatures of "others," thus undergirds the literary activity of both poets. Ivanova discusses the migration of Vaspurakan (Van) Armenians to North Cappadocia and Southern Pontus on the basis of a lead seal, a coin and a khachkar (cross-stone) that elucidate connections between this part of Asia Minor and Vaspurakan, and illustrate the ways Armenians did fit into the Byzantine political and sacred order. Lerner discusses two unclear lexical items in Psalm 120, Meshech and Kedar, to decide whether they refer to actual tribes or must be understood as idiomatic expressions describing the vague conditions of poetic usage. Bruni discusses Old Georgian Bible translations and provides a typology of manuscripts that contain Old Testament translations. The discussion will focus on the several stages in the development of this corpus and its various textual layers.

Bert Beynen

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

The Cultures of Georgia and Armenia

Schneider 1245

Pifer sheds new light on Kostandin Erznkatsi's The Rose and the Nightingale: they are meant to be read as signifiers for Christ and Gabriel's horn, respectively. Though scholars have generally focused on the "conversion" of the rose and nightingale (bulbul) from Islamicate poetry to a Christian milieu, this paper places Kostandin's exegesis in a comparative context. Others, including Jalal al-Din Rumi, likewise sought to teach audiences to discard outer narrative forms and seek the inner "secrets" within a text. Pifer argues that a common mode of engaging with audiences, and adapting the literatures of "others," thus undergirds the literary activity of both poets. Ivanova discusses the migration of Vaspurakan (Van) Armenians to North Cappadocia and Southern Pontus on the basis of a lead seal, a coin and a khachkar (cross-stone) that elucidate connections between this part of Asia Minor and Vaspurakan, and illustrate the ways Armenians did fit into the Byzantine political and sacred order. Lerner discusses two unclear lexical items in Psalm 120, Meshech and Kedar, to decide whether they refer to actual tribes or must be understood as idiomatic expressions describing the vague conditions of poetic usage. Bruni discusses Old Georgian Bible translations and provides a typology of manuscripts that contain Old Testament translations. The discussion will focus on the several stages in the development of this corpus and its various textual layers.

Bert Beynen