Session Title

Periodization II: What Can We Do about It?

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Eric Weiskott

Organizer Affiliation

Boston College

Presider Name

Eric Weiskott

Paper Title 1

Erasing the Past: The College Board's War against History

Presenter 1 Name

Leslie Abend

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Central High School

Paper Title 2

Periodization and the Longue Durée: Heresy and the Salem Witch Trials

Presenter 2 Name

R. D. Perry

Presenter 2 Affiliation

St. Louis Univ.

Paper Title 3

Narrating a Web instead of a Rupture

Presenter 3 Name

Miranda Wilcox

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Brigham Young Univ.

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

Megan Cook

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Colby College

Start Date

9-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2020

Description

The traditional periodization of the Middle Ages no longer seems as helpful as it once was. In recent years, medievalists have begun to question and to chip away at some of the concepts that have shaped this period: the implied modernity and superiority of the Renaissance, a sense of homogeneity (religious, economic, and cultural), and Eurocentrism. At the same time, the growing marginalization of medieval studies and the humanities more generally at the institutional level have made questions about the identity of the medieval period all the more pressing. Along with "Periodization I: Do We Need It? (Roundtable)," this session will provide a forum for reconsidering the question of periodization and identifying a path forward.

Eric Weiskott

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Periodization II: What Can We Do about It?

Fetzer 2020

The traditional periodization of the Middle Ages no longer seems as helpful as it once was. In recent years, medievalists have begun to question and to chip away at some of the concepts that have shaped this period: the implied modernity and superiority of the Renaissance, a sense of homogeneity (religious, economic, and cultural), and Eurocentrism. At the same time, the growing marginalization of medieval studies and the humanities more generally at the institutional level have made questions about the identity of the medieval period all the more pressing. Along with "Periodization I: Do We Need It? (Roundtable)," this session will provide a forum for reconsidering the question of periodization and identifying a path forward.

Eric Weiskott