Session Title

Interpreting and Using Law in the Middle Ages I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Iuris Canonici Medii Aevi Consociatio (ICMAC), the International Society of Medieval Canon Law

Organizer Name

Melodie H. Eichbauer

Organizer Affiliation

Florida Gulf Coast Univ.

Presider Name

Melodie H. Eichbauer

Paper Title 1

Early English Use of Inquisitorial Procedure: Tithes, Spouses and Benefices, Templars, Sorcerers

Presenter 1 Name

Henry Ansgar Kelly

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Los Angeles

Paper Title 2

Ex Officio Inquests and Heresy Prosecutions in Medieval England

Presenter 2 Name

R. H. Helmholz

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 3

Qui tacet consentire videtur? Reception and Resistance in Local Ecclesiastical Law

Presenter 3 Name

Rowan Dorin

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 4

Because He Does Not Keep the Sabbath: Implementing Canon Law's Holy Day Regulations in Fifteenth-Century England

Presenter 4 Name

Justin Kirkland

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Iowa

Start Date

11-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2040

Description

Scholarship on legal sources has made important advances on two fronts. First, careful manuscript work has gone far in explaining the development of particular texts and how texts relate to each other. Such work is necessary to understand the evolution and spread of legal thinking. Second, scholars have made important inroads laying bare the application of law in the Middle Ages. Collectively, the papers in the two proposed sessions "Interpreting and Using Law in the Middle Ages" seek to bring these two different, but not mutually exclusive, fronts together.

The sessions, "Interpreting and Using Law in the Middle Ages," begin with the premise that law has frequently underpinned analyses of the Middle Ages and scholars have been drawn to legal documents and maxims to explain events and to reflect change. After all, the questions attached to studying legal sources provide a framework around which broader narratives form. For example, scholars have focused on questions of the transmission of texts, the nature and timing of the professionalization of law, and the relationship with normative law. These sessions explore the integration and use of law throughout the Middle Ages. They embrace the common theme that medieval law was a living object, and thus they are interested in how contemporaries turned to and used law within their socio-political and intellectual environment. We want presenters to integrate the textual analysis necessary to understand the evolution and transmission of the legal tradition into the broader study of medieval life, government, and practice. Presenters will be encouraged to place legal sources within the context of other sources such as letters, charters, chronicles, and governmental records. We want to demonstrate the wide applicability that the study of law offers and encourage others to think about the different ways in which legal texts can shed light on facets of medieval life and thought. Melodie H. Eichbauer

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Interpreting and Using Law in the Middle Ages I

Fetzer 2040

Scholarship on legal sources has made important advances on two fronts. First, careful manuscript work has gone far in explaining the development of particular texts and how texts relate to each other. Such work is necessary to understand the evolution and spread of legal thinking. Second, scholars have made important inroads laying bare the application of law in the Middle Ages. Collectively, the papers in the two proposed sessions "Interpreting and Using Law in the Middle Ages" seek to bring these two different, but not mutually exclusive, fronts together.

The sessions, "Interpreting and Using Law in the Middle Ages," begin with the premise that law has frequently underpinned analyses of the Middle Ages and scholars have been drawn to legal documents and maxims to explain events and to reflect change. After all, the questions attached to studying legal sources provide a framework around which broader narratives form. For example, scholars have focused on questions of the transmission of texts, the nature and timing of the professionalization of law, and the relationship with normative law. These sessions explore the integration and use of law throughout the Middle Ages. They embrace the common theme that medieval law was a living object, and thus they are interested in how contemporaries turned to and used law within their socio-political and intellectual environment. We want presenters to integrate the textual analysis necessary to understand the evolution and transmission of the legal tradition into the broader study of medieval life, government, and practice. Presenters will be encouraged to place legal sources within the context of other sources such as letters, charters, chronicles, and governmental records. We want to demonstrate the wide applicability that the study of law offers and encourage others to think about the different ways in which legal texts can shed light on facets of medieval life and thought. Melodie H. Eichbauer