Session Title

The Legacy of Tolkien's Medievalism in Contemporary Works

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Tales after Tolkien Society

Organizer Name

Geoffrey B. Elliott

Organizer Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Presider Name

Geoffrey B. Elliott

Paper Title 1

Caines Cynne in Azeroth: Tolkien's Medievalism in the Warcraft Series

Presenter 1 Name

Benjamin C. Parker

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Northern Illinois Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Two Eyes of the Dragon: J. R. R. Tolkien's Beowulf as an Introduction to English Literature in Academic Enviroments

Presenter 2 Name

Isabella Aparecida Leite Nogueira; Mariana Mello Alves de Souza

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. Federal de Juiz de Fora; Univ. Federal de Juiz de Fora

Paper Title 3

Diluting Divinity: Connecting Genesis to Diablo by Way of Numenor

Presenter 3 Name

Rachel Cooper

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Saskatchewan

Start Date

12-5-2019 8:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2016

Description

As has been amply attested, Tolkien’s medievalist work in his Middle-earth corpus has exerted an outsized influence on subsequent fantasy and medievalist popular culture, and, following Paul B. Sturtevant’s assertions in The Middle Ages in Popular Imagination, it is largely or chiefly through popular cultural engagement with the materials that people—both the general public and those who become the students and scholars of the medieval—develop their early understandings of the Middle Ages. Decades on, Tolkien’s influence on popular culture—books, yes, but also movies, tabletop games, video games, television series, music, and other elements of popular understanding—continues to be felt, and continued examination of that influence is therefore warranted.

-Geoffrey B. Elliott

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May 12th, 8:30 AM

The Legacy of Tolkien's Medievalism in Contemporary Works

Fetzer 2016

As has been amply attested, Tolkien’s medievalist work in his Middle-earth corpus has exerted an outsized influence on subsequent fantasy and medievalist popular culture, and, following Paul B. Sturtevant’s assertions in The Middle Ages in Popular Imagination, it is largely or chiefly through popular cultural engagement with the materials that people—both the general public and those who become the students and scholars of the medieval—develop their early understandings of the Middle Ages. Decades on, Tolkien’s influence on popular culture—books, yes, but also movies, tabletop games, video games, television series, music, and other elements of popular understanding—continues to be felt, and continued examination of that influence is therefore warranted.

-Geoffrey B. Elliott