Session Title

Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig: Forgotten or Passed Over Reigns in Tenth-Century England

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Mary Blanchard; Christopher Riedel

Organizer Affiliation

Ave Maria Univ.; Albion College

Presider Name

Mary Blanchard

Paper Title 1

Edmund's Oath of Loyalty in Perspective: Innovation, Emulation, and a French Prince

Presenter 1 Name

Isabelle Beaudoin (Tashjian Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Oxford

Paper Title 2

A Political Witch Hunt in Tenth-Century England?

Presenter 2 Name

Christopher Riedel

Paper Title 3

Manuscripts between Æthelstan and Æthelwold

Presenter 3 Name

Alison Hudson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

British Library

Paper Title 4

The Making (or Un-Making) of Eadwig, r. 955-959: Bringing a Neglected Reign into Focus

Presenter 4 Name

Chelsea Shields-Más

Presenter 4 Affiliation

SUNY College-Old Westbury

Start Date

11-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1360

Description

Edmund (r.939-946), Eadred (r.946-955), and Eadwig (r.955-959) ruled parts or all of England for twenty years, yet they are often ignored in favor of the men who came before or after them with little research being dedicated to these men in their own right. But how did the English kingdom develop from Æthelstan, arguably the first king of England, to the imperial coronation and Benedictine Reform of Edgar’s reign? This session aims to bring these often passed-over kings and their reigns into the light through a variety of methods all focused on these “lost” twenty years. Developing a clearer picture of these decades will both illuminate this understudied period and create a more unified view of the century between Alfred and Æthelred. Mary Blanchard

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig: Forgotten or Passed Over Reigns in Tenth-Century England

Schneider 1360

Edmund (r.939-946), Eadred (r.946-955), and Eadwig (r.955-959) ruled parts or all of England for twenty years, yet they are often ignored in favor of the men who came before or after them with little research being dedicated to these men in their own right. But how did the English kingdom develop from Æthelstan, arguably the first king of England, to the imperial coronation and Benedictine Reform of Edgar’s reign? This session aims to bring these often passed-over kings and their reigns into the light through a variety of methods all focused on these “lost” twenty years. Developing a clearer picture of these decades will both illuminate this understudied period and create a more unified view of the century between Alfred and Æthelred. Mary Blanchard