Session Title

Spirituality, Reform, and Humanism in Medieval Universities I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

American Cusanus Society

Organizer Name

Christopher M. Bellitto

Organizer Affiliation

Kean Univ.

Presider Name

Jason Aleksander

Presider Affiliation

San José State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Philip the Chancellor on "Time": Pastoral Care and the Emerging Faculty of Theology at the University of Paris, ca. 1230

Presenter 1 Name

Nancy van Deusen

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Claremont Graduate Univ.

Paper Title 2

Cusanus and the Rise of Aristotelianism at the University of Padua

Presenter 2 Name

Il Kim

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Auburn Univ.

Paper Title 3

Providential Universitas: Theorizing the Authority of the University in the Midst of the Western Schism

Presenter 3 Name

Jeffrey C. Witt

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Loyola Univ. Maryland

Start Date

9-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 205

Description

In the wake of the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, we take a renewed look at the medieval ethos out of which Luther—and reformers after him—emerged, especially from the setting of medieval universities across Europe. Those universities, in turn, had benefited from the increased contact with Islamic, Jewish, and eastern Greek thought after the Crusades and through attempts to unite the papacy within Roman Catholicism as well as with the Greek east. To explore this context, this is the first of three sessions linking together aspects of medieval reform that are typically separated: spirituality, institutional reform, and humanistic studies in form and content. Donald F. Duclow

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Spirituality, Reform, and Humanism in Medieval Universities I

Bernhard 205

In the wake of the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, we take a renewed look at the medieval ethos out of which Luther—and reformers after him—emerged, especially from the setting of medieval universities across Europe. Those universities, in turn, had benefited from the increased contact with Islamic, Jewish, and eastern Greek thought after the Crusades and through attempts to unite the papacy within Roman Catholicism as well as with the Greek east. To explore this context, this is the first of three sessions linking together aspects of medieval reform that are typically separated: spirituality, institutional reform, and humanistic studies in form and content. Donald F. Duclow