Session Title

Medieval Cities

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Program in Medieval Studies, Brown Univ.

Organizer Name

Mercedes Vaquero

Organizer Affiliation

Brown Univ.

Presider Name

Mercedes Vaquero

Paper Title 1

School and the City: The Socio-Economic Role of Education in Medieval French Cities

Presenter 1 Name

Sarah B. Lynch

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Angelo State Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Dream City Come True in Monsterland: Herzog Ernst and the Imagination of the Ideal City

Presenter 2 Name

Albrecht Classen

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Arizona

Paper Title 3

The Herbalists, the Cathedral, and Toledo's Changing Cityscape

Presenter 3 Name

Patrick Harris

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

9-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1245

Description

This open session welcomes papers that focus on histories of cities, their making, transformation, or disappearance, through the lens of the example of a medieval city in any geographical location between 400-1500 CE, and from any relevant academic discipline. We invite proposals on topics such as: the end of ancient cities; religious beliefs, conflict, and tolerance; the city and its margins; citizens and foreigners; the city as metaphor; sex (and romance) and the city. The session will allow the maximum flexibility both in the forms and content of the discussion, and it has no disciplinary limits.

Rationale: This session (and our “Medieval Cities” course at Brown University) tries to investigate questions such as: where did our modern cities come from? What is the role of bureaucracy, trade, craft-production, book culture. What is the role of ecclesiastical institutions and schools? How does the medieval city still live in modernity? How did the encounter/clash of people and civilizations manifest itself in medieval cities? We hope to foster a discussion about the continuities or discontinuities and disruptions that have conditioned the medieval cities under study. As an interdisciplinary session, with a broad chronological limit and geography, we expect new intellectual comparative perspectives. Mercedes Vaquero

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Cities

Schneider 1245

This open session welcomes papers that focus on histories of cities, their making, transformation, or disappearance, through the lens of the example of a medieval city in any geographical location between 400-1500 CE, and from any relevant academic discipline. We invite proposals on topics such as: the end of ancient cities; religious beliefs, conflict, and tolerance; the city and its margins; citizens and foreigners; the city as metaphor; sex (and romance) and the city. The session will allow the maximum flexibility both in the forms and content of the discussion, and it has no disciplinary limits.

Rationale: This session (and our “Medieval Cities” course at Brown University) tries to investigate questions such as: where did our modern cities come from? What is the role of bureaucracy, trade, craft-production, book culture. What is the role of ecclesiastical institutions and schools? How does the medieval city still live in modernity? How did the encounter/clash of people and civilizations manifest itself in medieval cities? We hope to foster a discussion about the continuities or discontinuities and disruptions that have conditioned the medieval cities under study. As an interdisciplinary session, with a broad chronological limit and geography, we expect new intellectual comparative perspectives. Mercedes Vaquero