Session Title

Collaborative Pedagogy in Medieval Studies: A Scaffolded Workshop Series II: Outcomes: What Do We Want Our Students to Gain from Our Teaching?

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Daniel T. Kline

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Alaska-Anchorage

Presider Name

Daniel T. Kline

Paper Title 1

Workshop Leader

Presenter 1 Name

Myra Seaman

Presenter 1 Affiliation

College of Charleston

Paper Title 2

Workshop Leader

Presenter 2 Name

Joy Ambler

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Dwight-Englewood School

Start Date

10-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1220

Description

Taking its cue from Dorothy Kim’s call for allies “to do the work” and Jonathan Hsy's call for action, “#MoreVoices: Citation, Inclusion, and Working Together" on In the Middle (13 Jun 2017), and other developments since then, this series of collaborative pedagogical workshops has four related objectives: (1) to develop a set of shared, high-level outcomes that can be adapted to any medieval studies course (at the secondary- or college-level), (2) to map-out a "teaching module" that can be adapted to a variety of medieval studies courses, (3) to incorporate the now-widely-available and circulated collaborative bibliographical materials regarding race, gender, and sexuality in the Global Middle Ages, and (4) to bring together medievalists of all sorts “to do the work" of rethinking our pedagogy collaboratively to incorporate the voices, bodies, texts, perspectives that have been marginalized in traditional medieval studies. Dan Kline

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Collaborative Pedagogy in Medieval Studies: A Scaffolded Workshop Series II: Outcomes: What Do We Want Our Students to Gain from Our Teaching?

Schneider 1220

Taking its cue from Dorothy Kim’s call for allies “to do the work” and Jonathan Hsy's call for action, “#MoreVoices: Citation, Inclusion, and Working Together" on In the Middle (13 Jun 2017), and other developments since then, this series of collaborative pedagogical workshops has four related objectives: (1) to develop a set of shared, high-level outcomes that can be adapted to any medieval studies course (at the secondary- or college-level), (2) to map-out a "teaching module" that can be adapted to a variety of medieval studies courses, (3) to incorporate the now-widely-available and circulated collaborative bibliographical materials regarding race, gender, and sexuality in the Global Middle Ages, and (4) to bring together medievalists of all sorts “to do the work" of rethinking our pedagogy collaboratively to incorporate the voices, bodies, texts, perspectives that have been marginalized in traditional medieval studies. Dan Kline