Session Title

The Politics of Consumption: Feasting and Fasting in Medieval Iberia

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Ibero-Medieval Association of North America (IMANA); Mens et Mensa: Society for the Study of Food in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

Martha M. Daas

Organizer Affiliation

Old Dominion Univ.

Presider Name

Martha M. Daas

Paper Title 1

In the Kitchen? Female Saints in the Flos Santorum

Presenter 1 Name

Cristina Guardiola-Griffiths

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Delaware

Paper Title 2

Breast Is Best in Early Modern Spain

Presenter 2 Name

Emily Colbert Cairns

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Salve Regina Univ.

Paper Title 3

Feeding the Machine: Food, Falconry, and Fashioning Hybrid Subjectivity in Pedro López de Ayala’s Libro de la caza de las aves

Presenter 3 Name

Michael O'Brien

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Washburn Univ.

Paper Title 4

Medieval Iberian Drinking (and Feasting): Water and Wine

Presenter 4 Name

Michelle M. Hamilton

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Start Date

12-5-2019 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 209

Description

Roland Barthes has said that an entire ‘world’ is present in and signified by food. The study of food—what we do or do not eat as well as how, when, where, why and with whom we eat—is strongly linked to anthropological, cultural, social, political, and economic concerns. For this session Mens et Mensa seeks papers that consider food as a productive lens to analyze socio-cultural constructions of meaning. Papers could include topics such as gluttony, scarcity, feasting, fasting, and starvation. By analyzing narrative representations of these topics, we hope to gain greater insight into the role that the rhetoric of consumption plays in our larger understanding of medieval Iberia. John A. Bollweg

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May 12th, 10:30 AM

The Politics of Consumption: Feasting and Fasting in Medieval Iberia

Bernhard 209

Roland Barthes has said that an entire ‘world’ is present in and signified by food. The study of food—what we do or do not eat as well as how, when, where, why and with whom we eat—is strongly linked to anthropological, cultural, social, political, and economic concerns. For this session Mens et Mensa seeks papers that consider food as a productive lens to analyze socio-cultural constructions of meaning. Papers could include topics such as gluttony, scarcity, feasting, fasting, and starvation. By analyzing narrative representations of these topics, we hope to gain greater insight into the role that the rhetoric of consumption plays in our larger understanding of medieval Iberia. John A. Bollweg