Session Title

Beyond the Canso

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Société Guilhem IX

Organizer Name

Mary Franklin-Brown

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Cambridge

Presider Name

Sarah-Grace Heller

Presider Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Paper Title 1

The Troubadour Canso in the Context of Social Reality

Presenter 1 Name

William D. Paden

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Northwestern Univ.

Paper Title 2

Beyond the Canso, and Off to the Crusades: The Case of Raimbaut de Vaqueiras

Presenter 2 Name

Vincent Pollina

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Tufts Univ.

Paper Title 3

Beyond the Canso: The Troubadour Palais and the Estribot

Presenter 3 Name

Courtney Joseph Wells

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Paper Title 4

Beyond the Chanson: (Less) Successful Troubadour Genres in the Trouvère Tradition

Presenter 4 Name

Daniel E. O'Sullivan

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Mississippi

Start Date

9-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 212

Description

The troubadours are known primarily for their love lyrics, which crystalized in the later twelfth century into the genre of the canso. Yet not only did this crystallization occur late, but the troubadours’ inventiveness in new genres was irrepressible. From the adaptation of such widespread genres as the May song or the dawn song, to the creation of one-offs such as the excuse song or the I-don’t-know-what-it-is, they filled the court air with their playful experiments. This session is dedicated to the other poetry of the troubadours and its social context. Mary Franklin-Brown

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Beyond the Canso

Bernhard 212

The troubadours are known primarily for their love lyrics, which crystalized in the later twelfth century into the genre of the canso. Yet not only did this crystallization occur late, but the troubadours’ inventiveness in new genres was irrepressible. From the adaptation of such widespread genres as the May song or the dawn song, to the creation of one-offs such as the excuse song or the I-don’t-know-what-it-is, they filled the court air with their playful experiments. This session is dedicated to the other poetry of the troubadours and its social context. Mary Franklin-Brown