Session Title

Medieval Manuscripts in the Midwest: New Research from "Hidden" Collections

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Rare Books and Manuscripts Library, The Ohio State Univ.

Organizer Name

Eric J. Johnson

Organizer Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Presider Name

Eric J. Johnson

Paper Title 1

Exploring Columbus, The Ohio State University Library, MS.MR.13: La Vie de madame Katherine

Presenter 1 Name

Abigail S. Greff

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Mark of Devotion and Brush with Destruction: The Hidden History of One Book of Hours

Presenter 2 Name

Kara Ann Morrow

Presenter 2 Affiliation

College of Wooster

Paper Title 3

Medieval Manuscripts from the Bibliotheca Phillippica at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library of the University of Kansas

Presenter 3 Name

N. Kıvılcım Yavuz

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Kenneth Spencer Research Library, Univ. of Kansas

Paper Title 4

How a Noble Is Made: Evidence of Use in a Sixteenth-Century Spanish Letter of Nobility

Presenter 4 Name

Lucía Aja López

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Start Date

7-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1320

Description

North America’s largest and most famous medieval manuscript collections might be located on the East and West coasts, but the American Midwest is littered with manuscript materials, much of it so far completely unexplored. Whether complete codices, disjunct fragments of illuminated books, or the isolated documents of legal culture and practice, these Midwestern manuscripts—dispersed through both institutional and private collections—have much to offer the wider world of the international manuscript studies community. This session will feature original research highlighting the stories of some of the many startling manuscript treasures scattered in previously hidden collections in seemingly unexpected places.

This session welcomes proposals for 20-minute papers from across the wide spectrum of manuscript studies, including codicology and paleography, textual studies, musicology, art history, provenance history, and the digital humanities. The aim is to surface little-known or unknown manuscripts held by institutions and collectors outside the "normal" locations more commonly associated with North American manuscript collecting and scholarship. Eric J. Johnson

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May 7th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Manuscripts in the Midwest: New Research from "Hidden" Collections

Sangren 1320

North America’s largest and most famous medieval manuscript collections might be located on the East and West coasts, but the American Midwest is littered with manuscript materials, much of it so far completely unexplored. Whether complete codices, disjunct fragments of illuminated books, or the isolated documents of legal culture and practice, these Midwestern manuscripts—dispersed through both institutional and private collections—have much to offer the wider world of the international manuscript studies community. This session will feature original research highlighting the stories of some of the many startling manuscript treasures scattered in previously hidden collections in seemingly unexpected places.

This session welcomes proposals for 20-minute papers from across the wide spectrum of manuscript studies, including codicology and paleography, textual studies, musicology, art history, provenance history, and the digital humanities. The aim is to surface little-known or unknown manuscripts held by institutions and collectors outside the "normal" locations more commonly associated with North American manuscript collecting and scholarship. Eric J. Johnson