Session Title

Impound, Outlaw

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Rossell Hope Robbins Library, Univ. of Rochester

Organizer Name

Edward Mead Bowen; Marissa Crannell-Ash

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Rochester; Univ. of Rochester

Presider Name

Edward Mead Bowen; Marissa Crannell-Ash

Paper Title 1

Rhetoric of Outlawry and Its Normative Complexities in Anglo-Saxon Legal Texts

Presenter 1 Name

Yi-chin Huang

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 2

From Beast to Man-without-Rights: Outlawry in Iceland according to Grágás and Jónsbók

Presenter 2 Name

Julian E. Valle

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. i Bergen

Paper Title 3

Animal as Criminal and Judge in Bevis of Hampton

Presenter 3 Name

Rachel Emling

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Arizona State Univ.

Paper Title 4

Forced Migration, Religious Persecution, and the Figure of the Jew in Late Medieval English Drama

Presenter 4 Name

Robin Kello

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Los Angeles

Start Date

9-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1335

Description

With the animal turn, analysis of medieval interactions between humans and animals has shifted from considering animals as mere symbols or resources -- readings that have largely reinforced a perceived human-animal boundary in the Middle Ages -- to consider a broad range of medieval beliefs, values, and practices that complicate, blur, and even dissolve this boundary. One recent and particularly fruitful line of scholarship has considered vulnerability as a shared condition with the power to transcend this boundary. This panel explores imprisonment and ambiguous political/legal standing as conditions which can mutually inform and, in some cases, unite the human and non-human experience in the Middle Ages and beyond. Anna Siebach-Larsen

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Impound, Outlaw

Schneider 1335

With the animal turn, analysis of medieval interactions between humans and animals has shifted from considering animals as mere symbols or resources -- readings that have largely reinforced a perceived human-animal boundary in the Middle Ages -- to consider a broad range of medieval beliefs, values, and practices that complicate, blur, and even dissolve this boundary. One recent and particularly fruitful line of scholarship has considered vulnerability as a shared condition with the power to transcend this boundary. This panel explores imprisonment and ambiguous political/legal standing as conditions which can mutually inform and, in some cases, unite the human and non-human experience in the Middle Ages and beyond. Anna Siebach-Larsen