Session Title

Medieval Virtualities (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Program in Medieval Studies, Rutgers Univ.

Organizer Name

Danielle Allor

Organizer Affiliation

Rutgers Univ.

Presider Name

Jennifer N. Brown

Presider Affiliation

Marymount Manhattan College

Paper Title 1

"Tristes ymaginacions" and Virtual Phenomenologies in Christine de Pisan's Epistre de la prison de vie humaine

Presenter 1 Name

Alani Rosa Hicks-Bartlett

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Brown Univ.

Paper Title 2

God as Mirror-Eye: A Re-Evaluation of the Relationship between Perspectivist Optics and Painting in the Later Middle Ages

Presenter 2 Name

Isabella M. Weiss

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Rutgers Univ.

Paper Title 3

Virtual Beings in Dreamt Worlds: Theorizing Medieval (Im)Materiality with English Dream Visions

Presenter 3 Name

Danielle Allor

Paper Title 4

Imagined Fictions: The Unconscious Aesthetics of Chaucer's Parliament of Fowls

Presenter 4 Name

Katherine Passmore

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Rutgers Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1125

Description

Medieval literature and art abound with representations of people and things that are not materially present but nevertheless have real effects, from visions of transcendent religious ecstasy to the inventions of rhetoric. Scholars such as Martin K. Foys, Elizabeth Fowler, Martha Dana Rust, and Seeta Chaganti have recently invoked new media, virtual subjects, manuscript matrices, and danced virtuality in relation to the Middle Ages. This roundtable seeks an interdisciplinary conversation on virtuality in the medieval period: its suitability as a term; its role in medieval philosophy; its connotations in critical theory; and its connections to modern understandings of representation and reality. Danielle Allor

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May 8th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Virtualities (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1125

Medieval literature and art abound with representations of people and things that are not materially present but nevertheless have real effects, from visions of transcendent religious ecstasy to the inventions of rhetoric. Scholars such as Martin K. Foys, Elizabeth Fowler, Martha Dana Rust, and Seeta Chaganti have recently invoked new media, virtual subjects, manuscript matrices, and danced virtuality in relation to the Middle Ages. This roundtable seeks an interdisciplinary conversation on virtuality in the medieval period: its suitability as a term; its role in medieval philosophy; its connotations in critical theory; and its connections to modern understandings of representation and reality. Danielle Allor