Session Title

The Ethical Dilemma of Collecting Manuscript Fragments: Loss, Gain, Opportunity, and Cost (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Rare Books and Manuscripts Library, The Ohio State Univ.

Organizer Name

Eric J. Johnson

Organizer Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Presider Name

Eric J. Johnson

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Raymond Clemens

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale Univ.

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Thomas A. Bredehoft

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Chancery Hill Books and Antiques

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Eric White

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Rose McCandless

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Paper Title 5

Discussant

Presenter 5 Name

Katharine C. Chandler

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Library of Congress

Paper Title 6

Discussant

Presenter 6 Name

Jim Sims

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

9-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1060

Description

“Fragmentology" has emerged as one of the dominant subjects in the broader manuscript studies field as digital technologies have facilitated the identification, location, and reaggregation of widely dispersed individual folios originally from the same common manuscript. The reconstruction of broken manuscripts addresses questions across the spectrum of medieval book studies, including codicology, paleography, art historical and textual research, historical provenance, modern consumerism, and the contested and shifting value of manuscript fragments as either objects of connoisseurship or scholarship. Collecting fragments is a highly contentious topic, and this session will address it from institutional, private, commercial, and scholarly perspectives.

This will be a roundtable session that will highlight and discuss both the positive and negative aspects of fragment collecting. Participants will represent a number of different perspectives, including those of librarians/curators, university professors/teachers/researchers, private collectors, manuscript/fragment dealers, and students. Each participant will present a short 5-7 minute statement exploring their own approach to the ethics of fragment collecting and use, and the session will feature an open discussion of the question by the panelists and the audience. Eric J. Johnson

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

The Ethical Dilemma of Collecting Manuscript Fragments: Loss, Gain, Opportunity, and Cost (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1060

“Fragmentology" has emerged as one of the dominant subjects in the broader manuscript studies field as digital technologies have facilitated the identification, location, and reaggregation of widely dispersed individual folios originally from the same common manuscript. The reconstruction of broken manuscripts addresses questions across the spectrum of medieval book studies, including codicology, paleography, art historical and textual research, historical provenance, modern consumerism, and the contested and shifting value of manuscript fragments as either objects of connoisseurship or scholarship. Collecting fragments is a highly contentious topic, and this session will address it from institutional, private, commercial, and scholarly perspectives.

This will be a roundtable session that will highlight and discuss both the positive and negative aspects of fragment collecting. Participants will represent a number of different perspectives, including those of librarians/curators, university professors/teachers/researchers, private collectors, manuscript/fragment dealers, and students. Each participant will present a short 5-7 minute statement exploring their own approach to the ethics of fragment collecting and use, and the session will feature an open discussion of the question by the panelists and the audience. Eric J. Johnson