Session Title

Early Medieval English Speculative Fictions

Sponsoring Organization(s)

English Dept. Medieval Colloquium, Yale Univ.; Scriptorium Working Group, Yale Univ.

Organizer Name

Celine Vezina

Organizer Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Presider Name

Celine Vezina

Paper Title 1

Speculative Elegy: Measuring Loss in Early Britain and Post-Scarcity Utopia

Presenter 1 Name

Daniel Remein

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Massachusetts-Boston

Paper Title 2

Magicians, Kings, and Sea Monsters: Hagiography as a Christian Pop Culture?

Presenter 2 Name

Stefanie Bellach

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Univ. Berlin

Paper Title 3

The Tree's Terror: Theological Horror and Eschatological Incertitude in The Dream of the Rood

Presenter 3 Name

Alexander D'Alisera

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Boston College

Start Date

9-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1320

Description

Recently, critics have begun to use categories such as horror and science fiction to explore the imaginative depths of Anglo-Saxon literature, as well as their implications for Anglo-Saxon intellectual culture and worldview. James Paz and Carl Kears' recent volume, Medieval Science Fiction, demonstrates some of the myriad and exciting ways medievalists can think with and about speculative fiction and medieval literature. While speculative fiction offers exciting and useful ways of thinking about genre, narrative, literariness, canon, and reading, both as we experience them now and as they existed in Anglo-Saxon England, it can be argued that applying the frameworks of later genres troubles our historical understandings of early texts. This panel seeks papers that explore the relationship of Anglo-Saxon texts to the subgenres of speculative fiction: science fiction, fantasy, horror, alternate history, and others. James Ensley

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Early Medieval English Speculative Fictions

Schneider 1320

Recently, critics have begun to use categories such as horror and science fiction to explore the imaginative depths of Anglo-Saxon literature, as well as their implications for Anglo-Saxon intellectual culture and worldview. James Paz and Carl Kears' recent volume, Medieval Science Fiction, demonstrates some of the myriad and exciting ways medievalists can think with and about speculative fiction and medieval literature. While speculative fiction offers exciting and useful ways of thinking about genre, narrative, literariness, canon, and reading, both as we experience them now and as they existed in Anglo-Saxon England, it can be argued that applying the frameworks of later genres troubles our historical understandings of early texts. This panel seeks papers that explore the relationship of Anglo-Saxon texts to the subgenres of speculative fiction: science fiction, fantasy, horror, alternate history, and others. James Ensley