Session Title

Playing with Game Theory I: Reading Games in Medieval Culture

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Game Cultures Society

Organizer Name

Sarah Jane Sprouse

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Alabama

Presider Name

Sarah Jane Sprouse

Paper Title 1

Escaping Labyrinths: The Attempt of Chaucer's Narrator to Console Himself in Book of the Duchess

Presenter 1 Name

Kristen York

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Game of Reading the Bobs in the Manuscripts of Sir Thopas

Presenter 2 Name

Julie Nelson Couch; Kimberly Bell

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.; Sam Houston State Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Modern Chess Board as a Reflection of Women Empowerment: Readings of the Game of Chess though the Late Middle Ages

Presenter 3 Name

Maria Luisa Gomez-Ivanov

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Texas State Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1325

Description

It is well known that the glosses and marginalia found in medieval manuscripts were commonly left by scribes, readers, and illuminators as ways to respond to the texts they read. Oftentimes, these marginal additions—including images of people, animals, flora, and fauna –were created to react directly to a given text and purposefully designed to be understood as interactive games to be played with the text and the reader. This session proposes to explore the gaming relationships among image, text, and reader to comprehend better how the people of the Middle Ages understood the purpose and function of games in literary texts. Sarah Sprouse

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May 8th, 10:00 AM

Playing with Game Theory I: Reading Games in Medieval Culture

Schneider 1325

It is well known that the glosses and marginalia found in medieval manuscripts were commonly left by scribes, readers, and illuminators as ways to respond to the texts they read. Oftentimes, these marginal additions—including images of people, animals, flora, and fauna –were created to react directly to a given text and purposefully designed to be understood as interactive games to be played with the text and the reader. This session proposes to explore the gaming relationships among image, text, and reader to comprehend better how the people of the Middle Ages understood the purpose and function of games in literary texts. Sarah Sprouse