Session Title

Getting to Their Mind through Their Plate: Food as Social Identity in the Medieval World

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Organizer Name

Erin Crowley-Champoux

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Presider Name

Michelle M. Hamilton

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 1

A Right-Anguilled People: Eels and Medieval English Identity

Presenter 1 Name

John Wyatt Greenlee

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Cornell Univ.

Paper Title 2

Zooarchaeology and Community Construction in Early Medieval Ireland

Presenter 2 Name

Erin Crowley-Champoux

Paper Title 3

"Weird but Not Disgusting": Food and History in the Classroom

Presenter 3 Name

Kristi DiClemente

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Mississippi Univ. for Women

Start Date

7-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

What we consider good to eat and the ways in which we structure eating events speak to our personal and community identities. Beyond culinary practices and etiquette, food acquisition engages with economies in the ways in which foods are produced and exchanged, and with politics in the ways that foods are accumulated and redistributed. There has been a growing scholarly interest in food studies and this session draws from those interests to explore the ways in which food as a marker of social identity during the medieval period and in the ways we reconstruct foods and feasting events. Erin Crowley-Champoux

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May 7th, 10:00 AM

Getting to Their Mind through Their Plate: Food as Social Identity in the Medieval World

Bernhard 204

What we consider good to eat and the ways in which we structure eating events speak to our personal and community identities. Beyond culinary practices and etiquette, food acquisition engages with economies in the ways in which foods are produced and exchanged, and with politics in the ways that foods are accumulated and redistributed. There has been a growing scholarly interest in food studies and this session draws from those interests to explore the ways in which food as a marker of social identity during the medieval period and in the ways we reconstruct foods and feasting events. Erin Crowley-Champoux