Session Title

Fourteenth-Century Religious Cultures

Sponsoring Organization(s)

14th Century Society

Organizer Name

Maya Soifer Irish

Organizer Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Presider Name

Hollis Shaul

Presider Affiliation

Miami Univ. of Ohio

Paper Title 1

The Church Cheated: Limoux Negre and the Power of Looking and Thinking

Presenter 1 Name

Louisa A. Burnham

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Middlebury College

Paper Title 2

Moving within the Margins: The Carmelite Miracles of Toulouse

Presenter 2 Name

Sucharita Ray

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Makeshift Reliquaries of the Béguins: Considering Enshrinement as an (Un)Orthodox Practice

Presenter 3 Name

Corrine Kannenberg

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Description

In the last few decades, scholars have begun to recognize the diversity of religious thought and experience in medieval Europe. For example, religious historians have started to think less in terms of Christianity and more in terms of “Christianities” or even “micro-Christianities.” Nowhere arguably is this multiplicity of devotional practice, religious experience and even dogma more evident than in the Fourteenth Century. From Schism within the institutional Church, to the inquisition and the experiences of female mystics and beguines, the fourteenth was a century in which the line between saint and subversive, between canonical and controversial, was continuously blurred. This session examines the multiplicity of fourteenth-century religious cultures, formal and informal, elite and lay, male and female, Christian, Jewish and Muslim, on their own terms, and seeks to find what commonalities these diverse religious cultures might share. Maya Soifer Irish

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 8th, 3:30 PM

Fourteenth-Century Religious Cultures

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

In the last few decades, scholars have begun to recognize the diversity of religious thought and experience in medieval Europe. For example, religious historians have started to think less in terms of Christianity and more in terms of “Christianities” or even “micro-Christianities.” Nowhere arguably is this multiplicity of devotional practice, religious experience and even dogma more evident than in the Fourteenth Century. From Schism within the institutional Church, to the inquisition and the experiences of female mystics and beguines, the fourteenth was a century in which the line between saint and subversive, between canonical and controversial, was continuously blurred. This session examines the multiplicity of fourteenth-century religious cultures, formal and informal, elite and lay, male and female, Christian, Jewish and Muslim, on their own terms, and seeks to find what commonalities these diverse religious cultures might share. Maya Soifer Irish