Session Title

Love, Fear, Anger, Sorrow: Emotions and Diseases of the Soul in Islamicate Literature I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Great Lakes Adiban Society

Organizer Name

Cameron Cross

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Presider Name

Kevin Blankinship

Presider Affiliation

Brigham Young Univ.

Paper Title 1

Angry Men: On Emotions and Masculinities in Samarqandī's Sindbād-nāmeh

Presenter 1 Name

Alexandra Hoffmann

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 2

After Tears, before Ecstatic Praise: On Disciplining the Whimsy Self in the Burdah

Presenter 2 Name

Sahar Ishtiaque Ullah

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Paper Title 3

Emotion and Sanctity in Timurid Hagiography

Presenter 3 Name

Rubina Salikuddin

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Bryn Mawr College

Paper Title 4

Emoting through Anecdotes, Feeling through Literature

Presenter 4 Name

Jonathan Lawrence

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Oxford

Start Date

7-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1345

Description

The study of emotions in the pre-modern Islamicate Middle East is beginning to attract scholarly attention as an emerging field. Since, as in Medieval Europe, the word ‘emotion’ has no direct correspondence to an Islamicate concept, we invite scholars to examine how the term akhlāq (ethics, morals, character traits) can be mapped onto/as a history of emotions. While developed in medical and philosophical texts as ‘diseases of the soul’, emotions are portrayed in various ways across a wide spectrum of literary traditions of the Islamicate Middle East in Arabic, Persian, and Ottoman Turkish, and thus provide ample ground for fruitful collaboration. We especially welcome critical engagement with the concept of ‘emotion’ and the Islamicate term akhlāq so as to determine semantic overlap and differences between the two categories. Furthermore, we encourage studies that assess the feasibility of applying theoretical approaches to emotions developed for Medieval Europe to the Islamicate world. Such studies can focus on emotion in the Qurʾān, illnesses of the soul in philosophical texts, the refinement of the self in advice literature, or on the portrayal of emotion in narrative and lyric poems. We hope that a shared vocabulary will enable future comparative projects between medievalists of various specializations.

Keywords: Islamicate, emotion, soul, ethics, self, literature

Cameron Cross

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May 7th, 10:00 AM

Love, Fear, Anger, Sorrow: Emotions and Diseases of the Soul in Islamicate Literature I

Schneider 1345

The study of emotions in the pre-modern Islamicate Middle East is beginning to attract scholarly attention as an emerging field. Since, as in Medieval Europe, the word ‘emotion’ has no direct correspondence to an Islamicate concept, we invite scholars to examine how the term akhlāq (ethics, morals, character traits) can be mapped onto/as a history of emotions. While developed in medical and philosophical texts as ‘diseases of the soul’, emotions are portrayed in various ways across a wide spectrum of literary traditions of the Islamicate Middle East in Arabic, Persian, and Ottoman Turkish, and thus provide ample ground for fruitful collaboration. We especially welcome critical engagement with the concept of ‘emotion’ and the Islamicate term akhlāq so as to determine semantic overlap and differences between the two categories. Furthermore, we encourage studies that assess the feasibility of applying theoretical approaches to emotions developed for Medieval Europe to the Islamicate world. Such studies can focus on emotion in the Qurʾān, illnesses of the soul in philosophical texts, the refinement of the self in advice literature, or on the portrayal of emotion in narrative and lyric poems. We hope that a shared vocabulary will enable future comparative projects between medievalists of various specializations.

Keywords: Islamicate, emotion, soul, ethics, self, literature

Cameron Cross