Session Title

The Materiality of Knowledge in the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Anna Majeski; Austin Powell

Organizer Affiliation

Institute of Fine Arts, New York Univ.; Catholic Univ. of America

Presider Name

Anna Majeski

Paper Title 1

An Observant Model of Sanctity: The Letters of Jerome in Manuscript Miscellanies

Presenter 1 Name

Austin Powell

Paper Title 2

The Art of Entanglement in Thirteenth-Century Anagni

Presenter 2 Name

Marius B. Hauknes

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 3

Serpentine Scimitars and Sarasvati's Speech: The Materiality of Knowledge in Medieval Malwa, ca. 1000-1400

Presenter 3 Name

Saarthak Singh (Congress Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Institute of Fine Arts, New York Univ.

Paper Title 4

Response

Presenter 4 Name

Daniel B. Hobbins

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Start Date

8-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

As vehicles for authoritative texts, as images in miniature or monumental settings, as objects imbricated in practice, or as architectural containers, material artifacts stood at the intersection between abstract intellectual concepts, and the body of the active viewer/reader. But material objects not only served as means to embody knowledge, they transformed, extended, and disseminated knowledge in spaces of lived experience. This panel will bring together medievalists across disciplines increasingly grappling with how material artifacts and their contexts shaped the perception, reception and performance of knowledge. Our interdisciplinary approach will facilitate scholars’ engagement with new questions, methodologies, and approaches. Anna Majeski

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 8th, 3:30 PM

The Materiality of Knowledge in the Middle Ages

Bernhard 210

As vehicles for authoritative texts, as images in miniature or monumental settings, as objects imbricated in practice, or as architectural containers, material artifacts stood at the intersection between abstract intellectual concepts, and the body of the active viewer/reader. But material objects not only served as means to embody knowledge, they transformed, extended, and disseminated knowledge in spaces of lived experience. This panel will bring together medievalists across disciplines increasingly grappling with how material artifacts and their contexts shaped the perception, reception and performance of knowledge. Our interdisciplinary approach will facilitate scholars’ engagement with new questions, methodologies, and approaches. Anna Majeski