Session Title

Medievalist Collaborations of Tenured and Adjunct Faculty (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Organizer Name

Timothy R. W. Jordan

Organizer Affiliation

Ohio Univ.-Zanesville

Presider Name

Mickey Sweeney

Presider Affiliation

Dominican Univ.

Paper Title 1

Sharing Arguments to Strengthen Students' Critical Skills: Team Teaching Shakespeare with Adjunct Faculty

Presenter 1 Name

Paul R. Thomas

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Brigham Young Univ.

Paper Title 2

Cohabitating Collaboration: Maneuvering the Academic Two-Body Problem

Presenter 2 Name

David O'Neil; Monica O'Neil

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Southern Indiana; Univ. of Southern Indiana

Paper Title 3

Steadying the Ladder from the Bottom

Presenter 3 Name

Timothy R. W. Jordan

Paper Title 4

Steadying the Ladder from the Top

Presenter 4 Name

Emily M. Baldys

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Millersville Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 5

Managing the Unmanageable: True Stories of Contingent Collaboration with Faculty

Presenter 5 Name

Matthew Evan Davis

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Blinn College

Paper Title 6

Leaping Off the Flying Buttress of Faith in Academia: The Good Tenured Professors Who Trust the Underemployed Superlatively-Educated Adjuncts to Do Well Enough to Teach

Presenter 6 Name

Phillip A. Bernhardt-House

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Skagit Valley College-Whidbey Island/Columbia College-Whidbey Island

Start Date

7-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

In the last year, the number of university faculty working off of the tenure-track has reached 73%, and other projections of the last ten years predict that number could go as high as 85%.[1] Such decline in tenure brings dramatic changes to the academic freedom, economic status, and time commitments of the professoriate. Contingent faculty, however, have much to offer with their own training, years of experience, and research aspirations. Being off the tenure-track does not automatically preclude adjuncts from pursuing research or special teaching projects, but it can make it harder with often more limited resources. This panel will seek to model ways in which tenure- and non-tenure-track faculty have worked together to their mutual benefit. While it certainly may be true that tenured faculty need to act as a voice for adjuncts’ concerns, this session will be most interested in ways that collaborations have been beneficial for both parties involved. Alison Langdon

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May 7th, 1:30 PM

Medievalist Collaborations of Tenured and Adjunct Faculty (A Roundtable)

Bernhard 204

In the last year, the number of university faculty working off of the tenure-track has reached 73%, and other projections of the last ten years predict that number could go as high as 85%.[1] Such decline in tenure brings dramatic changes to the academic freedom, economic status, and time commitments of the professoriate. Contingent faculty, however, have much to offer with their own training, years of experience, and research aspirations. Being off the tenure-track does not automatically preclude adjuncts from pursuing research or special teaching projects, but it can make it harder with often more limited resources. This panel will seek to model ways in which tenure- and non-tenure-track faculty have worked together to their mutual benefit. While it certainly may be true that tenured faculty need to act as a voice for adjuncts’ concerns, this session will be most interested in ways that collaborations have been beneficial for both parties involved. Alison Langdon